ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

UNIONS

The charges filed with the National Labor Relations Board were dropped after the Minnesota Nurses Association agreed to its new contracts with hospitals.
Glacier Northwest had sued Teamsters Local Union No. 174, representing the company's truck drivers, in state court accusing the union of intentional property destruction during the strike.
Members of the Minnesota Nurses Association have agreed to the contract agreements reached with Twin Ports and Twin Cities hospitals last week. The contracts will last for three years.
The strike will begin Dec. 11, unless tentative contract agreements are made with hospitals before then. Nurses at Essentia and Twin Cities hospitals would strike for three weeks, until Dec. 31.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
The 15,000 union nurses at 15 hospitals in Minnesota and Wisconsin will vote Nov. 30. The vote could give MNA leaders the power to authorize another strike, following a three-day strike held in September, as they bargain for contracts.
United Steelworkers held a demonstration outside the Minnesota mine, where company and state officials touted the planned $150 million DR-grade pellet plant.
The health care system claims the Minnesota Nurses Association failed to include Essentia Health-Duluth in its list of facilities that received a strike notice.
Members Only
The Minnesota Nurses Association, which announced plans for 15,000 nurses to strike for three days starting Sept. 12, said Thursday they still plan to hold their strike, despite the charges.
The vote among 15,000 Minnesota Nurses Association members was "overwhelmingly" in favor of the strike, according to MNA.
A second Mayo Clinic in Minnesota has had nurses decertify themselves from union representation in the span of a week, this time, nurses at Mayo Clinic Health System in St. James.

ADVERTISEMENT

5 decades later, teachers are once again on the picket lines.
More than 650 lawyers and legal support staff with the Teamsters Local 320 have been negotiating a contract with the state’s Board of Public Defense for the past six months.
The 43-page report also pushes the Labor Department to ensure workers, who allege retaliation when engaged in organizing, receive full protection and prevent the misclassification of workers as independent contractors — a long-running battle with so-called "gig economy" workers.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT