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SCIENCE AND NATURE

Biophilia is becoming an increasingly popular principle in integrative medicine as researchers are finding health benefits associated with spending time outside.
Pioneer photographers share their favorite photos from June.
Regardless of how bad individual years are, the Minnesota Department of Health is not as concerned with year-to-year trends as it is concerned with the big picture over time, said agency tick disease specialist Elizabeth Schiffman.
New guidelines generally support state's current wolf population, but could allow hunting and trapping if federal protections end.

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The bill would provide money to states and tribes to recover troubled species
The increase in wetlands from the pervious year was the highest ever, but grasslands are declining.
Cooperative effort aims to help cattle rancher, wolves and wolf researchers.
The Red River Trail, more commonly known in Minnesota as the Pembina Trail, was used in the mid-1800s. Ox carts, often driven by the Métis — Indigenous people who lived and traded along Canadian fur trade routes — traveled in trains sometimes hundreds of oxen and carts long that took hours to pass by a home or small town.
Results from an extenisve 2021 popualtion survey shows 70% more walleyes than 2015.
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Wood and wire cages, placed in just the right spots, help keep predators out of wood turtle nests.

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No one was sure what to expect. While we didn't see a "meteor storm," observers with dark skies got a nice show.
"Growing Together" columnist Don Kinzler says our awareness of the invasive insect can help stop the spread.
Humans have eaten venison from CWD-infected deer before and did not get the disease, but at a recent Minnesota legislative hearing on this year’s environment and natural resources bill, a leader in the state’s effort to trace CWD said the key to preventing a possible animal-human jump is identifying and slowing the spread.

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