SUBSCRIBE NOW AND SAVE 3 months just 99 ¢/month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

SCIENCE AND NATURE

Members Only
Lonnie Dupre is filming the impact of climate change on the Polar Inuit people he met in Greenland 20 years ago.
The 2022 population goal setting includes the Arrowhead and north-central regions.
Members Only
A juvenile bald eagle was brought to an animal rehabilitation center in La Crosse, Wisconsin after being hit more than 80 miles away.
The multi-agency effort will remove forest fuels that spur bigger fires.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
The Minnesota Department of Transportation plans to remove trees from the Smoky Hills State Forest before it resurfaces Highway 34 in 2023.
Coasting through space for two more weeks, the Webb telescope will reach its destination in solar orbit 1 million miles from Earth - about four times farther away than the moon.
Check out the average seasonal ice cover on lakes near you with a map from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.
The so-called “forever chemicals” are used in a huge variety of products, from nonstick cookware to fire-suppressing foam, carpet and water-resistant clothing. For decades they’ve also been used to make ultra-fast, fluorinated ski wax, prized by cross-country ski racers.
Zookeepers, animal anesthesiologists, biomedical researchers, veterinary surgeons and exotic animal farriers raced to treat Skeeter in the few minutes they could safely let him be on the ground. Giraffes did not evolve to be off their feet, and it is one of the most dangerous things that can happen to them.
Known as PFAS, these chemicals are found in a variety of products. They have contaminated drinking water supplies around the United States, including in Minnesota. Minnesota has been dealing with the impacts of PFAS pollution for years. Here’s a closer look at how the federal plan could affect those efforts.

ADVERTISEMENT

Conservationists say plans for restoring prairie will keep Blanding's turtles off the road and help the struggling population.
Gladys was found injured on the side of a road Thursday morning, Oct. 14, but died before zoo staff could treat her.
Although Minnesota Zoo officials believe she is likely somewhere on the zoo’s 485-acre campus, they asked anyone who lives nearby to call their local police department if they spot Gladys.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT