SUBSCRIBE NOW AND SAVE 3 months just 99 ¢/month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

INDIGENOUS IMPACTS

The Endazhi-Nitaawiging, or "the place where it grows," charter school announced it will enroll 86 students in fall 2022 as part of the future school's first enrollment of students.
Though the day was chilly, excitement filled the air as more than 100 Leech Lake Tribal Council and community members took part in a ribbon cutting ceremony for the newly acquired Leech Lake Market, formerly Teal’s Market, on Thursday afternoon.
Spirits were high Monday morning as around 50 members of the Red Lake community, tribal council and state politicians took part in the groundbreaking of the Endazhi-Nitaawiging charter school set to open in Red Lake in fall 2022.
The Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe announced on Friday their venture into the food retail industry with the purchase of Teal's Market located in Cass Lake.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa’s 36-acre farm has seen several new additions in the last year.
Two years ago, the Red Lake Boys and Girls Club was on a downward spiral, with membership declining and grant money dwindling. Then, Thomas Barrett landed what he called his "ideal career," as CEO of the club. And together, both Barrett and the club have flourished, with club attendance doubling, Ojibwe cultural programming increasing and grant money on the upswing -- all after the club was in potential danger of shutting down.
While many were celebrating the United States Independence Day on July Fourth, the celebration was just getting started on Tuesday, July 6, in the Red Lake Nation.
A team that is guided by Native Americans will explore how to enhance the lives and opportunities for Native American in the area by studying the impacts of cultural genocide brought about by U.S. policy. The school received $275,000 this spring from the New York-based Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to use over the course of three years for this project.
Hundreds of people gathered from all around the community -- with some from as far away as California -- down by the Lake Bemidji waterfront on Wednesday for a Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women rally to show support for families affected by these all-too-frequent tragedies.
Racial justice, environmental protection and treaty rights were the focus of a "We're Still Here" event held Tuesday in Paul Bunyan Park.

ADVERTISEMENT

Challenges were addressed and achievements celebrated during the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe’s annual State of the Band Address, which took place virtually on Friday, March 26.
While the pandemic has undoubtedly caused a myriad of issues, according to Jordan May, the director of the Red Lake Homeless Shelter, the COVID-19 situation has acted as a catalyst -- bringing to light long-ignored issues in the area and banding support-providing organizations together.
A shortened version of the fifth annual Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women’s walk was held Sunday, Feb. 14, on Valentine’s Day.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT