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INDIGENOUS IMPACTS

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Sponsored by Honor the Earth — an organization that raises awareness for Native environmental issues — the conference is set for 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 16, at the Northern Lights Casino Event Center in Walker and will host several keynote speakers who will focus on green business, climate, environment, sustainability and Indigenous communities.
The jersey features a combination of loom and beadwork designs reflecting both Dakota and Ojibwe heritage.
The Region 2 Arts Council has announced contemporary Native American artist Kent Estey and bassoonist Miriam Brack Webber as the recipients of the 2022-2023 Artist Fellowship.
Already a young leader, Lori Martin-Kingbird of Cass Lake has been appointed by Gov. Tim Walz to the Young Women’s Cabinet, a group that aims to improve the lives and opportunities of young women across the state.
Cecelia Humphrey was named president of the Northwest Division Board for the Minnesota Association of Student Councils, which provides leadership opportunities to students throughout the state. As president, she had the chance to invite student councils and their advisors from across the region to answer the question, “What is Your Why?” right on her stomping grounds.
Complete with live music, corn hole, food, face painting and other family-friendly activities, attendees had a chance to meet with state and local candidates who will be on the Nov. 8 general election ballot. Organized by MN350 Action, NDN Collective, Indigenous Environmental Network, Leech Lake, Red Lake and White Earth Nations, the nonpartisan event aimed to amplify civic engagement between the general public and elected officials.

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Originally from the White Earth Nation, Goodwin has worked for over 30 years as an artist. He was honored in 2012 with a Community Spirit Award from the First Peoples Fund, which chooses its honorees for their commitment to sustaining the cultural values of Native American people.
The Institute is supported by a two-year, $600,000 grant from the Minnesota State system of colleges and universities and will operate out of the American Indian Resource Center.
Sporting ribbon skirts and other traditional regalia, about 75 participants held up signs of support and marched along Highway 1 as a traveling drum group was pulled on a trailer to Red Lake Nation College where a traditional walleye feast awaited them.

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