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Science instructor explains his bout with Lyme disease, tick prevention

In this episode of the Northland Outdoors Podcast, Ryan Saulsbury, a science instructor and outdoorsman, joins host Chad Koel to talk about ticks.

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They’re small but their effects on the human body can be devastating.

In this episode of the Northland Outdoors Podcast, Ryan Saulsbury, a science instructor and outdoorsman, joins host Chad Koel to talk about ticks.

In 2001, Saulsbury suffered a bout with Lyme disease and how multiple tests finally narrowed down his diagnosis. He shares his experiences, talks about how a tick works, offers tips to avoid ticks when you’re outdoors and the best methods on how to extract ticks from your skin and clothing.

“One of the things that makes Lyme so difficult is Lyme has a nickname called the Great Imitator, where it imitates so many other diseases, which is part of the reason why it takes so long for people to get diagnosed,” Saulsbury said.

Time stamps:

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  • Open / Introduction
  • 2:30 / Ryan Saulsbury’s background and why he’s interested in tick research
  • 6:30 / What is Lyme disease and why is it so difficult to diagnose
  • 11:30 / How an infection works and how the disease affected him
  • 16:45 / Co-infections that come along for the ride
  • 22:35 / How a tick works and how does Lyme disease transfer to humans
  • 32:55 / Where ticks are most likely to be found on the body
  • 34:45 / What’s the best application to avoid ticks and how to treat your clothing coming in from the outdoors
  • 41:32 / What to do if you spot a tick on your skin?
  • 47:30 / Why a quick response is important
  • 50:30 / Where you can find more information

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