SUBSCRIBE NOW AND SAVE 3 months just 99 ¢/month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Minnesota to receive $500K in new chronic waste disease funding

A total of $2.8 million will be distributed between Minnesota and 16 other states dealing with chronic wasting disease, or CWD.

Minnesota will receive nearly $550,000 through a federal program meant to combat the spread of a deer-killing disease, federal officials announced Thursday, Oct. 15. Forum News Service file photo

ST. PAUL — Minnesota will receive nearly $550,000 through a federal program meant to combat the spread of a deer-killing disease, federal officials announced Thursday, Oct. 15.

Money earmarked by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service will fund three projects in the state, according to a department news release. A total of $2.8 million will be distributed between Minnesota and 16 other states dealing with chronic wasting disease, or CWD.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will put approximately $250,000 of the state's share toward deer culling programs, according to a USDA project overview. Nearly $130,500 will go toward a Minnesota Board of Animal Health project meant to identify factors that can lead to the development of the disease in farmed deer.

The Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, meanwhile, the sole tribe slated to benefit from the program, will receive approximately $166,000 for a regional CWD surveillance program.

Discovered in Minnesota in 2010, the disease is still relatively rare here. It is always fatal, though, and today is known to be in roughly half of the U.S, according to the DNR.

What to read next
Blue jays are a true year-round Minnesota avian resident. That alone is endearing. And even though the species is often maligned as a nest-robbing egg and nestling thief, the blue jay is among a group of birds considered one of the most intelligent avifauna on the planet.
Here are the two big questions about these little birds: How do they survive the cold? And where do they go in the summer?
Members Only
Lonnie Dupre is filming the impact of climate change on the Polar Inuit people he met in Greenland 20 years ago.
The changes follow a wildlife-section reorganization that began about three years ago by DNR managers whose intent was to align the section's staffing, fleet and other expenses with available money.