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Comment period extended for Chippewa restoration project

The USDA Forest Service, with the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe as a cooperating agency, is proposing to restore fire-dependent ecosystems and associated wildlife habitat and cultural resources and uses throughout a portion of the Chippewa National Forest.

Chippewa National Forest
The USDA Forest Service, with the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe as a cooperating agency, is proposing to restore fire-dependent ecosystems and associated wildlife habitat and cultural resources and uses throughout a portion of the Chippewa National Forest.
Photo by U.S. National Forest Service, USDA

CASS LAKE — The USDA Forest Service, with the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe as a cooperating agency, is proposing to restore fire-dependent ecosystems and associated wildlife habitat and cultural resources and uses throughout a portion of the Chippewa National Forest.

The area is within the proclamation boundary of the Leech Lake Nation and within Beltrami, Cass and Itasca Counties.

In order to provide the public with a greater opportunity to participate in the planning process, the comment period has been extended to March 15, a release said.

There are several ways to submit comments:

  • Submit comments electronically in a common file format to: comments-eastern-chippewa@usda.gov with the subject line "Fire-Dependent Restoration Project.” Include your name, address, telephone number and the title of the project with your comments.
  • Mail comments to the Chippewa National Forest Supervisor’s Office. Attn: Christopher Worthington, 200 Ash Ave. NW, Cass Lake, MN 56633.
  • Submit comments by fax to (218)-335-8641 .

For more information, contact forest planner Christopher Worthington, by phone at (218) 335-8643 or by email at christopher.worthington@usda.gov.

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