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Brothers boost Beavers: Center Jesse Hein snaps to Jordan to keep the BSU offense rolling

BEMIDJI--When Bemidji State's quarterback starts yelling at his center (or vice versa), don't worry. It's not personal. It's just family. Jesse Hein, BSU's 6-foot-1, 305-pound starting center, snaps the ball to Jordan, BSU's junior quarterback, m...

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Jesse Hein, left, and Jordan Hein pose for a photo during a recent practice at Chet Anderson Stadium. The brothers will play their last game together next month in the Mineral Water Bowl. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

BEMIDJI-When Bemidji State's quarterback starts yelling at his center (or vice versa), don't worry. It's not personal. It's just family. Jesse Hein, BSU's 6-foot-1, 305-pound starting center, snaps the ball to Jordan, BSU's junior quarterback, more than 60 times per game. It's a productive relationship-but they aren't always smiling. "Some people kinda laugh at us," said Jesse. "We disagree sometimes but it's just us communicating. People think we're fighting all the time but we're just trying to get things accomplished." "When we get into those kinds of 'heated' quote-unquote conversations, it's a little different when we do it because we yell at each other then two seconds later it's just fine," added Jordan. "If you do it with another teammate they might hold a grudge but not with Jesse."

2985807+112416.S.BP_.HEINBROS-ACTION-WEB.jpg

It's something they've been doing since they were playing together at Perham High School. But it hasn't been as much fun for them as it has been this season. The Beavers finished the regular season 8-3-their best record since 2011-and a berth in the Mineral Water Bowl for the first time in 10 years. BSU interim head coach Brent Bolte said the brothers talk to one another differently, but they're both good leaders and captains. "Jordy's a different kind of guy. He's a more laid-back, happy-go-lucky type kid," Bolte said. "Jesse's a lot more serious. But both are tremendous leaders and ambassadors in the community. They're just top-notch kids." BSU went 3-8 in 2014-Jordan's first season at BSU since transferring from Division I Northern Iowa-but has rebounded with 7-4 last season and 8-3 this year. "We were on some pretty successful teams through high school," Jesse said. "We had maybe one rough year.... Going 3-8 wasn't something we were really accustomed to. But it was pretty awesome to finish out, these last couple years, with some successful seasons. "Being arguably one of the top offenses in our school history is a pretty special deal, along with going 8-3," Jordan added. "We're extremely disappointed we were nine points away from possibly going undefeated and making the playoffs, that's frustrating, but the success we've had offensively, that's been very very satisfying." The Heins-Jesse is a year and a half older than Jordan but just one grade above him-have been a big part of BSU's offensive success this season. The Beavers finished with the No. 2 scoring offense in the NSIC and No. 3 in total offense, rushing offense and passing offense. Twice this season the Beavers ran for over 400 yards as a team thanks to Jesse and the rest of BSU's offensive line (Matt Valentine, Jake Krause, Ben Johnson and Brandon Schindler). [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2985810","attributes":{"alt":"Bemidji State quarterback Jordan Hein (7) throws the football during a recent game against Minnesota Crookston.","class":"media-image","height":"391","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] "Jesse's been on the field I think for 42 out of 45 games," Bolte said. "He's been a rock at center for us and a tremendous leader. That kind of epitomizes what we want to have in the program." And Jordan, who is a finalist for the Harlon Hill Trophy-essentially the Division II Heisman-set a number of BSU's career passing records this season and finished the season ranked among the top 20 in the nation in seven categories. He did all that despite missing two games with a leg injury. Transfer boosts team, brothers The two experienced some success at Perham-the Yellowjackets made it to the Class 3A state quarterfinals in 2011, when Jesse was a senior and Jordan a junior. In 2012, the team (sans Jesse) made it to the state semifinals before losing. Jesse, who was a bit undersized for the offensive line, switched from center to guard after his junior year and immediately caught the eye of the Beavers' coaching staff and the rest of the NSIC. Bemidji's location made his choice fairly easy. "BSU was a good fit," Jesse said. "I played with a guard and a quarterback who played at Duluth, and they were there when I was getting recruited. It was not easy to not go there but something about Bemidji just felt right." Jordan initially decided to try his hand at Division I football at Northern Iowa but quickly realized it wasn't for him. The fact that Jesse was in Bemidji made his decision a no-brainer. "I loved everything about UNI. The program, the coaches, the players. It just didn't work out the way I wanted to," Jordan said. "I just needed to make a change. I knew regardless of where (Jesse) was, that's where I was going to go. It ended up being Bemidji and it ended up working out well for us, I think." It also worked out well for their family. Their parents, Terry and Tracy, and sister Julie, along with numerous other friends and relatives, have been able to see nearly every game. "If you go through the tailgating area on a given Saturday, there's always a huge crowd from the Perham area," Jesse said. "Family, friends, teachers. Some days there's 25, 30 people here who just come up to watch the games. That's awesome." Jesse, who is graduating this year with an education degree and will begin student teaching at Perham in January, said he's looking forward to playing one more game with his brother. The Beavers take on Washburn Dec. 3 in the Mineral Water Bowl in Excelsior Springs, Mo. "Coming into the year we wanted to get one step further and do something BSU's never done," he said. "Obviously we were hoping to make the playoffs. But lo and behold, we still have a chance to do something BSU's never done before and win the Mineral Water Bowl. So that would be pretty special, I think."BEMIDJI-When Bemidji State's quarterback starts yelling at his center (or vice versa), don't worry. It's not personal. It's just family. Jesse Hein, BSU's 6-foot-1, 305-pound starting center, snaps the ball to Jordan, BSU's junior quarterback, more than 60 times per game. It's a productive relationship-but they aren't always smiling. "Some people kinda laugh at us," said Jesse. "We disagree sometimes but it's just us communicating. People think we're fighting all the time but we're just trying to get things accomplished." "When we get into those kinds of 'heated' quote-unquote conversations, it's a little different when we do it because we yell at each other then two seconds later it's just fine," added Jordan. "If you do it with another teammate they might hold a grudge but not with Jesse." [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2985807","attributes":{"alt":"Bemidji State senior center Jesse Hein, venter, snaps the ball to his brother Jordan, during a recent practrice at Chet Anderson","class":"media-image","height":"301","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] It's something they've been doing since they were playing together at Perham High School. But it hasn't been as much fun for them as it has been this season. The Beavers finished the regular season 8-3-their best record since 2011-and a berth in the Mineral Water Bowl for the first time in 10 years. BSU interim head coach Brent Bolte said the brothers talk to one another differently, but they're both good leaders and captains. "Jordy's a different kind of guy. He's a more laid-back, happy-go-lucky type kid," Bolte said. "Jesse's a lot more serious. But both are tremendous leaders and ambassadors in the community. They're just top-notch kids." BSU went 3-8 in 2014-Jordan's first season at BSU since transferring from Division I Northern Iowa-but has rebounded with 7-4 last season and 8-3 this year. "We were on some pretty successful teams through high school," Jesse said. "We had maybe one rough year.... Going 3-8 wasn't something we were really accustomed to. But it was pretty awesome to finish out, these last couple years, with some successful seasons. "Being arguably one of the top offenses in our school history is a pretty special deal, along with going 8-3," Jordan added. "We're extremely disappointed we were nine points away from possibly going undefeated and making the playoffs, that's frustrating, but the success we've had offensively, that's been very very satisfying." The Heins-Jesse is a year and a half older than Jordan but just one grade above him-have been a big part of BSU's offensive success this season. The Beavers finished with the No. 2 scoring offense in the NSIC and No. 3 in total offense, rushing offense and passing offense. Twice this season the Beavers ran for over 400 yards as a team thanks to Jesse and the rest of BSU's offensive line (Matt Valentine, Jake Krause, Ben Johnson and Brandon Schindler).
"Jesse's been on the field I think for 42 out of 45 games," Bolte said. "He's been a rock at center for us and a tremendous leader. That kind of epitomizes what we want to have in the program." And Jordan, who is a finalist for the Harlon Hill Trophy-essentially the Division II Heisman-set a number of BSU's career passing records this season and finished the season ranked among the top 20 in the nation in seven categories. He did all that despite missing two games with a leg injury. Transfer boosts team, brothers The two experienced some success at Perham-the Yellowjackets made it to the Class 3A state quarterfinals in 2011, when Jesse was a senior and Jordan a junior. In 2012, the team (sans Jesse) made it to the state semifinals before losing. Jesse, who was a bit undersized for the offensive line, switched from center to guard after his junior year and immediately caught the eye of the Beavers' coaching staff and the rest of the NSIC. Bemidji's location made his choice fairly easy. "BSU was a good fit," Jesse said. "I played with a guard and a quarterback who played at Duluth, and they were there when I was getting recruited. It was not easy to not go there but something about Bemidji just felt right." Jordan initially decided to try his hand at Division I football at Northern Iowa but quickly realized it wasn't for him. The fact that Jesse was in Bemidji made his decision a no-brainer. "I loved everything about UNI. The program, the coaches, the players. It just didn't work out the way I wanted to," Jordan said. "I just needed to make a change. I knew regardless of where (Jesse) was, that's where I was going to go. It ended up being Bemidji and it ended up working out well for us, I think." It also worked out well for their family. Their parents, Terry and Tracy, and sister Julie, along with numerous other friends and relatives, have been able to see nearly every game. "If you go through the tailgating area on a given Saturday, there's always a huge crowd from the Perham area," Jesse said. "Family, friends, teachers. Some days there's 25, 30 people here who just come up to watch the games. That's awesome." Jesse, who is graduating this year with an education degree and will begin student teaching at Perham in January, said he's looking forward to playing one more game with his brother. The Beavers take on Washburn Dec. 3 in the Mineral Water Bowl in Excelsior Springs, Mo. "Coming into the year we wanted to get one step further and do something BSU's never done," he said. "Obviously we were hoping to make the playoffs. But lo and behold, we still have a chance to do something BSU's never done before and win the Mineral Water Bowl. So that would be pretty special, I think."BEMIDJI-When Bemidji State's quarterback starts yelling at his center (or vice versa), don't worry. It's not personal. It's just family.Jesse Hein, BSU's 6-foot-1, 305-pound starting center, snaps the ball to Jordan, BSU's junior quarterback, more than 60 times per game. It's a productive relationship-but they aren't always smiling."Some people kinda laugh at us," said Jesse. "We disagree sometimes but it's just us communicating. People think we're fighting all the time but we're just trying to get things accomplished.""When we get into those kinds of 'heated' quote-unquote conversations, it's a little different when we do it because we yell at each other then two seconds later it's just fine," added Jordan. "If you do it with another teammate they might hold a grudge but not with Jesse."

2985807+112416.S.BP_.HEINBROS-ACTION-WEB.jpg

It's something they've been doing since they were playing together at Perham High School. But it hasn't been as much fun for them as it has been this season. The Beavers finished the regular season 8-3-their best record since 2011-and a berth in the Mineral Water Bowl for the first time in 10 years.BSU interim head coach Brent Bolte said the brothers talk to one another differently, but they're both good leaders and captains."Jordy's a different kind of guy. He's a more laid-back, happy-go-lucky type kid," Bolte said. "Jesse's a lot more serious. But both are tremendous leaders and ambassadors in the community. They're just top-notch kids."BSU went 3-8 in 2014-Jordan's first season at BSU since transferring from Division I Northern Iowa-but has rebounded with 7-4 last season and 8-3 this year."We were on some pretty successful teams through high school," Jesse said. "We had maybe one rough year.... Going 3-8 wasn't something we were really accustomed to. But it was pretty awesome to finish out, these last couple years, with some successful seasons."Being arguably one of the top offenses in our school history is a pretty special deal, along with going 8-3," Jordan added. "We're extremely disappointed we were nine points away from possibly going undefeated and making the playoffs, that's frustrating, but the success we've had offensively, that's been very very satisfying."The Heins-Jesse is a year and a half older than Jordan but just one grade above him-have been a big part of BSU's offensive success this season. The Beavers finished with the No. 2 scoring offense in the NSIC and No. 3 in total offense, rushing offense and passing offense.Twice this season the Beavers ran for over 400 yards as a team thanks to Jesse and the rest of BSU's offensive line (Matt Valentine, Jake Krause, Ben Johnson and Brandon Schindler).[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2985810","attributes":{"alt":"Bemidji State quarterback Jordan Hein (7) throws the football during a recent game against Minnesota Crookston.","class":"media-image","height":"391","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]"Jesse's been on the field I think for 42 out of 45 games," Bolte said. "He's been a rock at center for us and a tremendous leader. That kind of epitomizes what we want to have in the program."And Jordan, who is a finalist for the Harlon Hill Trophy-essentially the Division II Heisman-set a number of BSU's career passing records this season and finished the season ranked among the top 20 in the nation in seven categories. He did all that despite missing two games with a leg injury.Transfer boosts team, brothersThe two experienced some success at Perham-the Yellowjackets made it to the Class 3A state quarterfinals in 2011, when Jesse was a senior and Jordan a junior.In 2012, the team (sans Jesse) made it to the state semifinals before losing.Jesse, who was a bit undersized for the offensive line, switched from center to guard after his junior year and immediately caught the eye of the Beavers' coaching staff and the rest of the NSIC. Bemidji's location made his choice fairly easy."BSU was a good fit," Jesse said. "I played with a guard and a quarterback who played at Duluth, and they were there when I was getting recruited. It was not easy to not go there but something about Bemidji just felt right."Jordan initially decided to try his hand at Division I football at Northern Iowa but quickly realized it wasn't for him. The fact that Jesse was in Bemidji made his decision a no-brainer."I loved everything about UNI. The program, the coaches, the players. It just didn't work out the way I wanted to," Jordan said. "I just needed to make a change. I knew regardless of where (Jesse) was, that's where I was going to go. It ended up being Bemidji and it ended up working out well for us, I think."It also worked out well for their family. Their parents, Terry and Tracy, and sister Julie, along with numerous other friends and relatives, have been able to see nearly every game."If you go through the tailgating area on a given Saturday, there's always a huge crowd from the Perham area," Jesse said. "Family, friends, teachers. Some days there's 25, 30 people here who just come up to watch the games. That's awesome."Jesse, who is graduating this year with an education degree and will begin student teaching at Perham in January, said he's looking forward to playing one more game with his brother. The Beavers take on Washburn Dec. 3 in the Mineral Water Bowl in Excelsior Springs, Mo."Coming into the year we wanted to get one step further and do something BSU's never done," he said. "Obviously we were hoping to make the playoffs. But lo and behold, we still have a chance to do something BSU's never done before and win the Mineral Water Bowl. So that would be pretty special, I think."BEMIDJI-When Bemidji State's quarterback starts yelling at his center (or vice versa), don't worry. It's not personal. It's just family.Jesse Hein, BSU's 6-foot-1, 305-pound starting center, snaps the ball to Jordan, BSU's junior quarterback, more than 60 times per game. It's a productive relationship-but they aren't always smiling."Some people kinda laugh at us," said Jesse. "We disagree sometimes but it's just us communicating. People think we're fighting all the time but we're just trying to get things accomplished.""When we get into those kinds of 'heated' quote-unquote conversations, it's a little different when we do it because we yell at each other then two seconds later it's just fine," added Jordan. "If you do it with another teammate they might hold a grudge but not with Jesse."[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2985807","attributes":{"alt":"Bemidji State senior center Jesse Hein, venter, snaps the ball to his brother Jordan, during a recent practrice at Chet Anderson","class":"media-image","height":"301","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]It's something they've been doing since they were playing together at Perham High School. But it hasn't been as much fun for them as it has been this season. The Beavers finished the regular season 8-3-their best record since 2011-and a berth in the Mineral Water Bowl for the first time in 10 years.BSU interim head coach Brent Bolte said the brothers talk to one another differently, but they're both good leaders and captains."Jordy's a different kind of guy. He's a more laid-back, happy-go-lucky type kid," Bolte said. "Jesse's a lot more serious. But both are tremendous leaders and ambassadors in the community. They're just top-notch kids."BSU went 3-8 in 2014-Jordan's first season at BSU since transferring from Division I Northern Iowa-but has rebounded with 7-4 last season and 8-3 this year."We were on some pretty successful teams through high school," Jesse said. "We had maybe one rough year.... Going 3-8 wasn't something we were really accustomed to. But it was pretty awesome to finish out, these last couple years, with some successful seasons."Being arguably one of the top offenses in our school history is a pretty special deal, along with going 8-3," Jordan added. "We're extremely disappointed we were nine points away from possibly going undefeated and making the playoffs, that's frustrating, but the success we've had offensively, that's been very very satisfying."The Heins-Jesse is a year and a half older than Jordan but just one grade above him-have been a big part of BSU's offensive success this season. The Beavers finished with the No. 2 scoring offense in the NSIC and No. 3 in total offense, rushing offense and passing offense.Twice this season the Beavers ran for over 400 yards as a team thanks to Jesse and the rest of BSU's offensive line (Matt Valentine, Jake Krause, Ben Johnson and Brandon Schindler).
"Jesse's been on the field I think for 42 out of 45 games," Bolte said. "He's been a rock at center for us and a tremendous leader. That kind of epitomizes what we want to have in the program."And Jordan, who is a finalist for the Harlon Hill Trophy-essentially the Division II Heisman-set a number of BSU's career passing records this season and finished the season ranked among the top 20 in the nation in seven categories. He did all that despite missing two games with a leg injury.Transfer boosts team, brothersThe two experienced some success at Perham-the Yellowjackets made it to the Class 3A state quarterfinals in 2011, when Jesse was a senior and Jordan a junior.In 2012, the team (sans Jesse) made it to the state semifinals before losing.Jesse, who was a bit undersized for the offensive line, switched from center to guard after his junior year and immediately caught the eye of the Beavers' coaching staff and the rest of the NSIC. Bemidji's location made his choice fairly easy."BSU was a good fit," Jesse said. "I played with a guard and a quarterback who played at Duluth, and they were there when I was getting recruited. It was not easy to not go there but something about Bemidji just felt right."Jordan initially decided to try his hand at Division I football at Northern Iowa but quickly realized it wasn't for him. The fact that Jesse was in Bemidji made his decision a no-brainer."I loved everything about UNI. The program, the coaches, the players. It just didn't work out the way I wanted to," Jordan said. "I just needed to make a change. I knew regardless of where (Jesse) was, that's where I was going to go. It ended up being Bemidji and it ended up working out well for us, I think."It also worked out well for their family. Their parents, Terry and Tracy, and sister Julie, along with numerous other friends and relatives, have been able to see nearly every game."If you go through the tailgating area on a given Saturday, there's always a huge crowd from the Perham area," Jesse said. "Family, friends, teachers. Some days there's 25, 30 people here who just come up to watch the games. That's awesome."Jesse, who is graduating this year with an education degree and will begin student teaching at Perham in January, said he's looking forward to playing one more game with his brother. The Beavers take on Washburn Dec. 3 in the Mineral Water Bowl in Excelsior Springs, Mo."Coming into the year we wanted to get one step further and do something BSU's never done," he said. "Obviously we were hoping to make the playoffs. But lo and behold, we still have a chance to do something BSU's never done before and win the Mineral Water Bowl. So that would be pretty special, I think."

Jack is a copy editor for Forum News Service.
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