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Patrick Springer

Patrick Springer first joined The Forum in 1985. He covers a wide range of subjects including health care, energy and population trends. Email address: pspringer@forumcomm.com

A warmup is coming in June, but conflicting forces make it impossible to predict whether the summer will be hot and dry or hot and wet.
Essentia Health in Fargo is among the first to use a robotic endoscopy apparatus that allows low-risk access to hard-to-reach lung nodules in early development.
Infectious disease specialists say individual health status and vaccination history are important considerations in whether and when to get a second booster dose.
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A site near Bowman, North Dakota, has fossils revealing the last moments of the dinosaurs, wiped out millions of years ago. More findings from the site will be coming out.
North Dakota is slightly above the national average in the number of people taking mental health prescriptions, and has seen a sharp rise during the pandemic. Minnesota and South Dakota are closely behind North Dakota.
O'Keefe, CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt Library Foundation, always planned on donating a kidney to help his mother. He never suspected that his kidney would end up going to someone he's never met.
More extreme rain and snowstorms are expected in Minnesota and North Dakota, among other changes that come with an increasingly volatile climate, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
Sanford Health issued a statement disclosing that it has sustained an attempted "cyber security incident" but said it believes no personal or financial information has been compromised. An investigation continues.
The Minnesota Court of Appeals rejected arguments that Sebeka farmer Tim Nolte was acting as a front for R.D. Offutt Co. in seeking irrigation permits for 300 acres he bought from the giant potato-growing company. The court upheld the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources decision not to require an extensive environmental review for the irrigation project.
The Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation is building a $26 million greenhouse complex that will use natural gas now being flared to heat the complex and provide carbon dioxide, which plants need to grow. The tribe hopes this will be the first of several massive greenhouses.