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Tips for talking to kids

Fargo Police Detective Paula Ternes has been a trained forensic interviewer since 2006, specializing in crimes against children. She gives the following advice for parents when talking to their children about sex and child abuse: E Tell children ...

Fargo Police Detective Paula Ternes has been a trained forensic interviewer since 2006, specializing in crimes against children.

She gives the following advice for parents when talking to their children about sex and child abuse:

E Tell children from a young age the correct names for their body parts.

E Tell them it's safe for them to talk about anything.

"All of the children that I've worked with or talked to or interviewed, they all feel like it's their fault and that they're going to be in trouble," she said.

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E If a child discloses sexual or physical abuse, it's important for the caregiver to seek help immediately, whether through social services, police or another agency.

"Because not only do we want to make sure that the child is OK and get them help, but the family often needs help dealing with that situation," Ternes said. "The parents feel a lot of guilt."

E Ternes, who also investigates Internet luring cases, advises parents to talk to their children about being safe when using social networking sites, cell phones and online gaming systems.

Fargo Police Detective Paula Ternes has been a trained forensic interviewer since 2006, specializing in crimes against children.

She gives the following advice for parents when talking to their children about sex and child abuse:

- Tell children from a young age the correct names for their body parts.

- Tell them it's safe for them to talk about anything.

"All of the children that I've worked with or talked to or interviewed, they all feel like it's their fault and that they're going to be in trouble," she said.

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- If a child discloses sexual or physical abuse, it's important for the caregiver to seek help immediately, whether through social services, police or another agency.

"Because not only do we want to make sure that the child is OK and get them help, but the family often needs help dealing with that situation," Ternes said. "The parents feel a lot of guilt."

- Ternes, who also investigates Internet luring cases, advises parents to talk to their children about being safe when using social networking sites, cell phones and online gaming systems.

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