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Three 'super trusses' being assembled for Bemidji Regional Event Center

Workers are assembling the three "super trusses" - the main supports for the roof of the Bemidji Regional Event Center. Two of the trusses are 267 feet long and a third is 130 feet long. The trusses will be set next week. The trusses will support...

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Taken last weekend, this aerial photo of the site for the Bemidji Regional Event Center shows how the facility is taking shape. Construction now is moving into the next stage as workers are installing three "super trusses" that will support the roof of the BREC. Pioneer Photo/Monte Draper

Workers are assembling the three "super trusses" - the main supports for the roof of the Bemidji Regional Event Center.

Two of the trusses are 267 feet long and a third is 130 feet long. The trusses will be set next week.

The trusses will support the roof of the BREC and still allow for an unobstructed view of the arena bowl, according to Kraus-Anderson.

The super trusses, according to Kraus-Anderson:

- Are each made of 400 tons of steel, which require 28 truckloads for complete delivery.

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- Utilize 30 tons of connector plates, some of which weigh 9,000 pounds and are 4.5 inches thick.

- Require the use of 14,000 bolts. Drilling the holes for the bolts took six weeks, with workers working (on shifts) seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

- Will be set using 550-ton cranes.

Work at the BREC site may be viewed off of First Street East in a city lot east of the Glass Shack. The viewing area will be available for public viewing throughout the duration of work at the site.

Additionally, a webcam may be found online at http://www.paulbunyan.net/weathernews/webcam/eventcenter.html .

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