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'They look like marbles!' Students at Northern Elementary raise trout eggs (VIDEO, PHOTO GALLERY)

BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called "trout tech"s in Alison Tisdell's fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank.

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Tayshaun Kingbird starts to pour 500 rainbow trout eggs into an aquarium Thursday in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom at Northern Elementary. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank. “They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange.
 [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds. “We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them. “If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt. “The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern. Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.” Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]] “That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.” “Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked. “Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom. Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] “The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students. Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out. The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern. Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission. “A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.       BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank. “They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] 
Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds. “We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them. “If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt. “The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern. Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.” Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]] “That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.” “Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked. “Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom. Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] “The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students. Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out. The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern. Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission. “A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.       BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank. “They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds. “We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them. “If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained.
Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt. “The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern. Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.” Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]] “That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.” “Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked. “Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom. Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] “The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students. Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out. The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern. Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission. “A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.       BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank. “They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds. “We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them. “If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt. “The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern. Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.” Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild.
“That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.” “Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked. “Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom. Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] “The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students. Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out. The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern. Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission. “A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.       BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank. “They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds. “We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them. “If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt. “The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern. Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.” Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]] “That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.” “Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked. “Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom. Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank.
 [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] “The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students. Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out. The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern. Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission. “A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.       BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank. “They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds. “We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them. “If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt. “The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern. Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.” Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]] “That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.” “Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked. “Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom. Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] 
“The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students. Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out. The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern. Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission. “A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.       BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank.“They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange.
 [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds.“We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them.“If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt.“The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern.Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.”Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]]“That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.”“Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked.“Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom.Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]“The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students.Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out.The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern.Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission.“A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.   BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank.“They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] 
Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds.“We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them.“If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt.“The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern.Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.”Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]]“That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.”“Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked.“Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom.Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]“The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students.Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out.The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern.Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission.“A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.   BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank.“They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds.“We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them.“If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained.
Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt.“The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern.Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.”Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]]“That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.”“Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked.“Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom.Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]“The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students.Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out.The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern.Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission.“A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.   BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank.“They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds.“We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them.“If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt.“The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern.Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.”Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild.
“That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.”“Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked.“Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom.Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]“The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students.Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out.The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern.Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission.“A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.   BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank.“They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds.“We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them.“If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt.“The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern.Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.”Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]]“That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.”“Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked.“Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom.Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank.
 [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959050","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, speaks to a group of fifth graders about rainbow trout eggs Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]“The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students.Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out.The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern.Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission.“A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.   BEMIDJI -- As students at Northern Elementary jockeyed to get a closer look Thursday, a pair of students -- called “trout tech”s in Alison Tisdell’s fifth-grade classroom -- poured 500 or so trout eggs into a waiting fish tank.“They look like marbles,” one student exclaimed. Others immediately noticed the eggs’ coloring and debated whether it was more orange than pink, or more pink than orange.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959046","attributes":{"alt":"Jillian Maxwell measures the water temperature of the 500 rainbow trout eggs, which were poured into an aquarium Thursday. ","class":"media-image","height":"444","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959047","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, draws on the whiteboard to explain rainbow trout eggs grow Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"342","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Three classrooms at Northern will watch three sets of eggs grow into adolescent rainbow or brown trout over the winter, then release them into the Clearwater River this spring. They’ll take daily measurements of the tank’s water temperature, pH balance, ammonia levels and more as part of “Trout in the Classroom,” an educational program organized by school staff, the Department of Natural Resources and Trout Unlimited, a nonprofit organization that works to conserve coldwater fisheries and watersheds.“We’re going to tie it into math, and do a lot with data analysis,” Tisdell said. Her students will analyze trends in the data they record each day, and consider how changes to the eggs’ environment affect them.“If you adjust the water to certain different temperatures, you can get the eggs to hatch sooner or later,” Tisdell explained.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959048","attributes":{"alt":"Fifth grader Mya Lundeen raises her hand to ask Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday.","class":"media-image","height":"320","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]]Steve Young, a Trout in the Classroom coordinator, said the students at Northern can do math exercises to calculate when the eggs might hatch; learn about trout physiology, biology and watersheds; or even use the budding creatures as a creative writing prompt.“The possibilities for what you might be able to do with this are pretty endless,” Young said. The program is in its 10th year at Northern.Tony Standera, a DNR fisheries specialist, told Tisdell’s students how the trout eggs will develop into “sac frys,” then “swim-up frys,” then “fingerlings.”Many of the hundreds of eggs won’t make it all the way to adulthood or adolescence, he explained -- maybe 10 out of 1,000 in the wild.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959053","attributes":{"alt":"Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR,explains what an adult rainbow trout looks like to a classroom of fifth graders","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"413"}}]]“That's one reason why fish lay lots and lots of eggs,” Standera told the students. “Because they know that lots of their eggs aren't going to make it, but if they lay enough of them, enough fish will survive to grow to be adults and be able to reproduce so that that population continues to sustain itself.”“Is it possible that parent trout eat their children?,” one student asked.“Oh, absolutely,” Standera replied as a wave of morbid curiosity washed over the classroom.Standera said many of the larger fish will eat their smaller, weaker siblings. A few years ago, a class decided to keep two notorious cannibal trout -- which they nicknamed “Hannibal” and “Jaws” -- in the classroom’s tank.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2959052","attributes":{"alt":"A group of fifth graders listen to Tony Standera, fisheries specialist with the DNR, Thursday at Northern Elementary.","class":"media-image","height":"321","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"480"}}]] 
“The kids would come in in the morning, and there’d just be a tail sticking out of (Hannibal or Jaws’) mouths,” Young told the students.Tisdell’s class is the third at Northern to use Trout in the Classroom. She said watching her students’ excitement about other class’ trout tanks prompted her to try it out.The DNR records the number of trout in the Clearwater River every September, and usually can trace a few back to classrooms at Northern.Young said the program is a result of Trout Unlimited’s educational mission.“A better educated public is going to take better care of its resources,” he said.   

Joe Bowen is an award-winning reporter at the Duluth News Tribune. He covers schools and education across the Northland.

You can reach him at:
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