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Sex offender to be released in Bemidji

BEMIDJI--A level three sex offender will be released in Bemidji on Wednesday, Feb. 22. The Bemidji Police Department posted a fact sheet with details of Gerald Joseph Browneagle's release on social media Tuesday. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"me...

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BEMIDJI-A level three sex offender will be released in Bemidji on Wednesday, Feb. 22. The Bemidji Police Department posted a fact sheet with details of Gerald Joseph Browneagle's release on social media Tuesday.
According to the fact sheet, Browneagle will be living at the 600 block of Fourth Street NW and has a history of sexual contact with both juvenile and adult victims. He escaped from the Beltrami County Jail in 2009 where he had been held on criminal sexual conduct charges and was found later the same day. Browneagle is described as a 6-foot-1-inch tall, 284-pound American Indian male with black hair and brown eyes. Browneagle will not be wanted by police as he has served the sentence imposed on him by the court.BEMIDJI-A level three sex offender will be released in Bemidji on Wednesday, Feb. 22.The Bemidji Police Department posted a fact sheet with details of Gerald Joseph Browneagle's release on social media Tuesday.
According to the fact sheet, Browneagle will be living at the 600 block of Fourth Street NW and has a history of sexual contact with both juvenile and adult victims. He escaped from the Beltrami County Jail in 2009 where he had been held on criminal sexual conduct charges and was found later the same day.Browneagle is described as a 6-foot-1-inch tall, 284-pound American Indian male with black hair and brown eyes.Browneagle will not be wanted by police as he has served the sentence imposed on him by the court.

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