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Sanford Health to host hiring fair on April 19

Sanford Health in Bemidji will offer community members clinical and non-clinical career opportunities during its first-ever hiring fair set for 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at the Sanford Center, 1111 Event Center Drive NE.

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BEMIDJI — Sanford Health in Bemidji will offer community members clinical and non-clinical career opportunities during its first-ever hiring fair set for 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19, at the Sanford Center, 1111 Event Center Drive NE.

The hiring fair will feature on-site interviews, interactive career booths, resume/interview workshops, a Q&A with allied health and nursing leaders and speed networking for a chance to meet leaders face to face, a release said.

Staff will also be on site to help with applications and answer questions about open positions, sponsorships and Sandford's Education Assistance Program and more.

Positions are available for those 16 years old and older. Which include, but are not limited to, RNs; LPNs; CNAs; X-ray techs; phlebotomists; physical, occupational, speech and respiratory therapists; environmental service aides; food service workers; sterile processing technicians; athletic trainers and more.

For more information visit www.sanfordcareers.com .

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