ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Sampson to speak at AIRC

Kelvin Sampson, head men's basketball coach of the Indiana Hoosiers, will present a speech presentation entitled "A Philosophy of Success" at the American Indian Resource Center on the Bemidji State University campus May 5 at 7 p.m.

Kelvin Sampson, head men's basketball coach of the Indiana Hoosiers, will present a speech presentation entitled "A Philosophy of Success" at the American Indian Resource Center on the Bemidji State University campus May 5 at 7 p.m.

There is no charge for the adults-only presentation.

Coach Sampson is a member of the Lumbee Indian Tribe of North Carolina and is considered the first Native American coach to lead a team to the NCAA Division I Final Four.

Sampson led the 2007 Hoosiers to a 21-11 and has been named NABC National Coach of the Year (2002), Associated Press Coach of the Year (1995), Big Eight Coach of the Year (1995), and Pac-10 Coach of the Year (1991). He guided Oklahoma University to eight-straight 20-win seasons, 10 NCAA post-seasons, with a Sweet 16 appearance in 1999, a Final Four appearance in 2002, and an Elite Eight appearance in 2003.

The Blandin Foundation and the American Indian Resource Center are sponsoring the event.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Panther Hoops Coaching Clinic May 5 has been moved to the Bemidji Middle School due to the high estimate of attendance.

Event day registration is $85 per coach and includes a complimentary Kelvin Sampson DVD, Subway lunch, drawing chance, and Indiana Hoosiers notebook. Speakers include Sampson, Minnesota Ripknee's (ABL) and former Minneapolis Patrick Henry High School coach Larry McKenzie, and DeLaSalle High School coach Dave Thorson.

For more information, contact Dan Ninham at 368-6430, 759-7237 or 333-3215 ext. 1122.

What To Read Next
Mike Clemens, a farmer from Wimbledon, North Dakota, was literally (and figuratively) “blown away,” when his equipment shed collapsed under a snow load.
Wanda Patsche, new Farm Camp director, has farmed with her husband near I-90 in southern Minnesota since the 1970s and shares her passion for farming on her blog.
The University of Minnesota has been researching the effects of dough fermentation and wheat variety in creating bread that is easier to digest.