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Roadwork continues on schedule

The bulk of roadwork along Bemidji Avenue will still be focused on the portion from Third to Eighth streets, according to Andy Wagner, the project manger with Ulland Bros.

The bulk of roadwork along Bemidji Avenue will still be focused on the portion from Third to Eighth streets, according to Andy Wagner, the project manger with Ulland Bros.

Wagner reported Thursday during a meeting at Bemidji City Hall that milling work - the removal of the blacktop - will be complete by the end of this week on the entire roadway.

Meanwhile, two sanitary sewer crews have been working to expedite the process as much as possible, he said.

"Sanitary sewer is the process that can hold things back," Wagner said. "That's why we have two crews working as fast as they can."

Both crews have been focused on the first phase of the project, from Third to Eighth streets.

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"There's a lot happening there right now," Wagner said.

The temporary water system has been set up and should be operational next week, he said.

Todd Djonne, who works with the city of Bemidji's engineering department, said the temporary system has passed all needed tests.

"As far as progress goes, we're on schedule and it's looking good," Wagner said.

City Engineer Craig Gray and Public Works Director Andy Mack both praised the work of Ulland Bros. and the Minnesota Department of Transportation for the roadwork thus far.

Gray noted that the city has received a few calls, but that is expected on a project this size.

"Everything is going well, all things considered," Gray said.

Beltrami County Sheriff Phil Hodapp said his office had received some calls complaining about work trucks at the intersection of Highway 2 and Fifth Street.

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"There's been an issue during school rush hours in the morning and afternoon," Hodapp said.

Wagner said there now are 20 trucks in town and 10 will be leaving at the end of this week as the milling is complete.

"We'll be cutting it down by at least half," he said.

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