ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Paul Bunyan Communications hosts Youth Tour Essay Contest

Area high school students are encouraged to enter the Paul Bunyan Communications Essay Contest for a chance to attend the 2022 Youth Tour in Washington, D.C., from June 1-5, with all expenses paid by the company.

Paul Bunyan Communications web art.jpg
Paul Bunyan Communications

BEMIDJI — Area high school students are encouraged to enter the Paul Bunyan Communications Essay Contest for a chance to attend the 2022 Youth Tour in Washington, D.C., from June 1-5, with all expenses paid by the company.

Students interested in attending the Youth Tour need to submit a short essay, no more than 500 words in length, on why they would like to attend. Students must be 16 or 17 years of age and in high school. Their parent or guardian needs to be a member of Paul Bunyan Communications Cooperative, a release said.

Entries can be dropped off at the Paul Bunyan Communications office in Bemidji or Grand Rapids, or they can be mailed to Paul Bunyan Communications Essay Contest, 1831 Anne St. NW, Bemidji, MN 56601. The deadline for entries is Friday, March 4.

The trip features a comprehensive overview of the telecommunications industry, including careers in telecom, the critical role telecommunications plays in rural America, and how legislative and regulatory decisions affect the industry.

The tour allows youth to meet with members of Congress who represent rural constituents. They also participate in educational sessions about the Federal Communications Commission, the release said.

ADVERTISEMENT

All attendees of the Youth Tour will be required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination and follow all current NTCA protocols related to health and safety.

Paul Bunyan Communications has participated in sending a local high school student to the Youth Tour for over 25 years, the release said.

Related Topics: THINGS TO DOEDUCATION
What To Read Next
Mike Clemens, a farmer from Wimbledon, North Dakota, was literally (and figuratively) “blown away,” when his equipment shed collapsed under a snow load.