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Orientation for new BSU students Saturday

BEMIDJI--Orientation for new students at BSU on Saturday includes a program about safety and responsibility--an attempt by the university to prevent stories like last winter's, when alcohol and cold weather appear to have converged in the lives o...

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BEMIDJI-Orientation for new students at BSU on Saturday includes a program about safety and responsibility-an attempt by the university to prevent stories like last winter's, when alcohol and cold weather appear to have converged in the lives of two female students.

At the "Life on Campus and What You Need to Know" program, all incoming freshmen will see a presentation and panel discussion meant to foster a sense of caring and responsibility for others. The audience, assembling in 100 Hagg-Sauer Hall at 1 p.m., will receive green rubber bracelets carrying the message "S.O.S. SAVE OUR STUDENTS," and will screen a video called "Who's Got Your Back?: No Buddy Left Behind."

In the video, a student project produced with Lakeland Television, students and local law enforcement discuss the importance of the "buddy system," and ask students to respect others and look out for their wellbeing. BSU uploaded the video to its YouTube account on Aug. 6 and plans to share it on the university website, a news release said.

The idea for the bracelets, according to the release, came from a task force of campus community that met last winter after one student, who police said had been drinking, died of hypothermia and another student, who survived, was found unresponsive in the snow. In the second case, police said alcohol might have been a factor.

Related Topics: BEMIDJI STATE UNIVERSITY
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