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Oberstar concedes; says he wants a public service role

Congressman Jim Oberstar conceded defeat to opponent Chip Cravaack, ending his 36-year run in Congress. Oberstar, speaking at his office in the Gerald Heaney Federal Building in Duluth, said it wasn't "any one thing" that contributed to his loss,...

Congressman Jim Oberstar conceded defeat to opponent Chip Cravaack, ending his 36-year run in Congress.

Oberstar, speaking at his office in the Gerald Heaney Federal Building in Duluth, said it wasn't "any one thing" that contributed to his loss, but added that had voter turnout been higher, "the result may have been different."

Oberstar defended his votes on the federal stimulus and health care reform bills saying he didn't regret supporting those causes.

He said he wished his father were alive to see the health-care reform pass.

Oberstar also said he still will seek a role in public service, but didn't know yet what that would be.

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