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No more bodily fluids in another person’s food or drink: New Minnesota laws take effect Aug. 1

ST. PAUL -- A new Minnesota law taking effect Aug. 1 will make it illegal to put bodily fluids into another person's food or drink. The law was inspired by the case of a Blaine man who ejaculated into a co-worker's coffee cup. But it turned out n...

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ST. PAUL -- A new Minnesota law taking effect Aug. 1 will make it illegal to put bodily fluids into another person's food or drink.

The law was inspired by the case of a Blaine man who ejaculated into a co-worker's coffee cup. But it turned out nothing in state law actually made that illegal.

Starting Aug. 1, it will be a gross misdemeanor with a maximum fine of $3,000 to intentionally add blood, seminal fluid, vaginal fluid, urine or human feces to a substance "intended for human consumption."

Among the other major laws also taking effect Aug. 1:

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-- Limitations on police automated license plate readers. The compromise will require law enforcement to delete data from these readers within 60 days unless it's related to an ongoing investigation, require warrants for most use of the data, limit access to the data and set up compliance audits every two years.

-- Extra fines for people who repeatedly text while driving, which will now cost $225 in addition to the existing fines.

-- A ban on "straw purchasing," where someone buys a firearm or ammunition for another person who's not allowed to purchase them. This will be a gross misdemeanor with a maximum fine of $3,000.

-- A new "Right to Try" experimental drugs or medical devices for terminally ill patients.

-- New penalties for inmates and patients at the state security hospital who assault workers at the facility.

-- A five-year penalty felony for hiring an underage prostitute.

-- A comprehensive family law reform that changes how child custody is determined in the case of divorce.

-- A bar on the release of inmates with electronic monitoring devices until those devices have been activated.

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-- Two state holiday changes: Military Spouses and Families Day will be celebrated on the Sunday before Memorial Day, while Hire A Veteran Month will be moved from May to July.

-- Mothers of fetuses with chromosome disorders will receive "evidence-based education about giving birth to a baby diagnosed with the disorder."

-- Banks and other savings institutions will be able to offer raffles to their customers.


The Pioneer Press is a media partner of Forum News Service.

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