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MnDOT kicks off second annual 'Name a Snowplow' contest

After last year’s successful contest and outstanding snowplow name ideas, the Minnesota Department of Transportation is inviting the public to help name another round of eight snowplows -- one snowplow for each MnDOT district in the state.

ST. PAUL -- After last year’s successful contest and outstanding snowplow name ideas, the Minnesota Department of Transportation is inviting the public to help name another round of eight snowplows -- one snowplow for each MnDOT district in the state.

MnDOT encourages the public to get creative and submit their most witty, unique or punny snowplow name ideas on the agency’s website. The submission form will be open through Wednesday, Dec. 15, and the link will also be shared on MnDOT's social media channels.

This year’s contest includes a few basic rules:

  • Each person may submit up to three names.
  • Each submission is limited to a maximum of 30 characters.
  • Previous winning names will not be considered. Additionally, any politically inspired names (including phrases, slogans or plays on politicians’ names) or names including profanity or inappropriate language will be excluded. This contest is intended to be fun, lighthearted, family friendly and non-political.

MnDOT staff will review all name submissions, select some of the best name ideas, and invite the public to vote on their favorites in January 2022. The eight names that get the most votes will then make their way onto a snowplow in each district.

Minnesotans are encouraged to follow @mndot on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for updates on the “Name a Snowplow” contest, as well as winter weather alerts, safety messages, project updates and more, a release said.

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