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Man shot, killed in reported accidental shooting in west-central Minnesota

The Kandiyohi County Sheriff's Office received a report of an accidental shooting Tuesday evening. A 911 caller said a man had been shot and killed when a firearm discharged accidentally.

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LAKE LILLIAN, Minn. — A 64-year-old man died Tuesday from a reported accidental firearm discharge.
The victim’s identity will be released later, according to a news release from the Kandiyohi County Sheriff’s Office.

The Sheriff's Office received a 911 call at about 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, and the caller said the man had been shot in the head and killed when a firearm discharged accidentally.

The incident occurred in the 10000 block of 165th Avenue Southeast northwest of Lake Lillian.

The Sheriff’s Office, Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office are investigating.

In 42 years in the newspaper industry, Linda Vanderwerf has worked at several daily newspapers in Minnesota, including the Mesabi Daily News, now called the Mesabi Tribune in Virginia. Previously, she worked for the Las Cruces Sun-News in New Mexico and the Rapid City Journal in the Black Hills of South Dakota. She has been a reporter at the West Central Tribune for nearly 27 years.

Vanderwerf can be reached at email: lvanderwerf@wctrib.com or phone 320-214-4340
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