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Minnesota Supreme Court seeks public comment on cameras in courtrooms

ST. PAUL--The Minnesota Supreme Court has opened a public comment period regarding cameras in courtrooms. The period, which began Jan. 24 and will continue through March 26, will be followed by an April 25 hearing. Cameras are generally not allow...

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ST. PAUL-The Minnesota Supreme Court has opened a public comment period regarding cameras in courtrooms.

The period, which began Jan. 24 and will continue through March 26, will be followed by an April 25 hearing.

Cameras are generally not allowed in courtrooms without the consent of the parties involved. But in 2015, the Minnesota Supreme Court decided to allow a pilot project permitting audio and video coverage in certain proceedings without parties' consent.

At the end of 2017, an advisory committee that monitored the project filed a report with the Supreme Court, recommending that the pilot procedures be put in place permanently.

There are three ways to submit a public comment. Interested parties can submit comments by email to mjcappellateclerkofcourt@courts.state.mn.us , send comments by mail to AnnMarie S. O'Neill, Clerk of Appellate Courts; 305 Minnesota Judicial Center; 25 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd; St. Paul, MN 55155, or create an E-MACS account and file a comment electronically.

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