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Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig graduate Cecelia Meat inspired to pursue architecture

Inspiration can strike in the most unlikely places. In the case of Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig graduate Cecelia Meat, the television show, “How I Met Your Mother,” inspired her decision to pursue architecture after she graduates on May 26.

Cecelia Meat.jpg
Cecelia Meat
Annalise Braught / Bemidji Pioneer
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BENA — Inspiration can strike in the most unlikely places.

In the case of Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig graduate Cecelia Meat, the television show, “How I Met Your Mother,” inspired her decision to pursue architecture after she graduates on May 26.

“My brother started watching the show and he wanted me to get into it,” Meat said. “The main character, Ted Moseby, is an architect. Even though it isn’t real and it’s not exactly what architecture looks like in the real world, it was still nice to see his passion for it.”

Meat has since learned a lot about her future profession that sparked from casual viewing of the show and is designing her path accordingly.

Sketching her path

Meat has been accepted to Bemidji State University and plans to pursue her generals there, after which she may transfer elsewhere to receive the necessary training for architecture.

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“I’m not sure that I’ll stay at BSU all four years, but it’s close to home,” she said.

Meat sees her high school art experiences transferring to some of the duties related to her future job. Specifically, she received first place in a school art competition one year and earned second and third place at another competition a different year for her paintings.

At the same time, she realizes the bulk of her learning will take place in college.

“Being able to work with different media and sketching out buildings or other designs are really going to help me apply those skills,” Meat said. “Otherwise, much more of the skillset will come later.”

Meat has had to work through two main challenges to get to college, including procrastination and the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. However, she saw herself navigating these situations rather well.

“I only failed one class (during the pandemic), so I guess that isn’t that bad,” she added with a laugh. “For the most part, I did pretty well. Some things I just handle better than others.”

Looking back and ahead

Meat has participated in various other activities throughout her time at Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig including volleyball, Ojibwe QuizBowl and Youth Leaders.

She was also able to attend Washington D.C. her freshman year as part of the Close Up program where she took part in interactive lessons on the process of and history behind the federal government, toured national monuments, memorials and museums, and met with elected officials on Capitol Hill.

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Her favorite achievement, also in her freshman year, was attending a state competition for National History Day at the University of Minnesota-Minneapolis.

Relating to that year's theme of "Triumph and Tragedy," she recreated Vincent Van Gogh's "The Starry Night" and "Almond Blossoms" artwork.

"I used this opportunity to educate people a little more on who Van Gogh really was and his success during his time," Meat said. "Although I didn't advance to nationals, I gained great experience in public speaking and research."

Throughout her successes and challenges alike, Meat views her two advisors, Mike Schmid and Jodi Perrington, as her biggest mentors.

“They’ve been on me about which credits I need to take, how many credits to take and all of that,” Meat said. “Since seventh grade, they’ve been preparing me for high school and to graduate.”

With graduation on the horizon, Meat is ready to continue on her path to a career she can be truly passionate about.

“Looking back on my high school years now, it doesn’t feel like a long time coming,” Meat said. “I’m a little nervous about graduating, but I’m also excited. I can’t wait.”

Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig’s graduation will take place at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 26.

Related Topics: EDUCATIONBENA
Daltyn Lofstrom is a reporter at the Bemidji Pioneer focusing on education and community stories.
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