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Letter: Walk in the woods could bring out dangerous dogs

On May 16, I took a walk in the woods on resort property where I am vacationing and have frequented for 40 years. Soon thereafter, I correctly sensed some dogs had left their nearby residence and were making a beeline to my location. They arrived...

On May 16, I took a walk in the woods on resort property where I am vacationing and have frequented for 40 years. Soon thereafter, I correctly sensed some dogs had left their nearby residence and were making a beeline to my location. They arrived within 20 seconds; I was instantaneously "called to duty." My long ago, prior military experience reappeared from deep inside me as I faced four very large, vicious dogs, one of which was a pit bull.

Fight or flight; I chose to fight. When the galloping dogs were 20 feet away, I "charged" with my walking stick and hunting knife. The dogs (lucky for them) all stopped 6 feet away. We played a (not so fun) game of "tag-you're-it" for 30 seconds; then they left. I immediately began a "phased re-deployment" back to camp when I observed a man dressed in camouflage clothes 50 meters away. I chose not to engage him although it was quite apparent he had released his dogs and followed to observe what (or whom) they would maul.

I contacted the Cass County sheriff and a deputy later called. He said a dogcatcher would follow-up, as this incident was not a crime because the dogs were unsuccessful in "bleeding me." I said this was not a random set of loose dogs with a "pack mentality" but rather a person who knowingly and willfully released vicious dogs to satisfy some weird "phalanx" sickness on unsuspecting people while watching his own live and personal version of "faces of death."

The deputy refused to think outside the box and take proactive action. As of May 23, no dogcatcher has visited me. Citizens of Cass County; I choose to be proactive because next time it may be a child in the woods. You know how that story will end. A person is out there in our midst and he has malice toward all. The buck stops with the Cass County sheriff and his outdated policies and procedures for "protecting and serving" the citizens of this beautiful county.

Instead, he will probably have me run out of town and not be proactive in this case because it is not an election year, or is it?

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Kyle Corray

Cass Lake

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