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Latest rail corridor findings on City Council agenda

BEMIDJI--The future of the rail corridor is the feature agenda item for the Bemidji City Council's next meeting on Tuesday. The report on the rail corridor, compiled by the Saint Paul Port Authority, will be the second given to the council this y...

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Local business owner Mitch Rautio plans to develop Bemidji's downtown rail corridor making more space for housing and businesses. (Jillian Gandsey | Bemidji Pioneer)

BEMIDJI-The future of the rail corridor is the feature agenda item for the Bemidji City Council's next meeting on Tuesday.

The report on the rail corridor, compiled by the Saint Paul Port Authority, will be the second given to the council this year, the other was presented in March. According to city documents, the report includes additional site findings, an environmental review, an engineering review and recommendations.

More site investigations will be needed to fully understand the area's soil conditions, soil management standards and costs associated with any proposed site preparation, according to city documents. Additional soil testing, geotechnical engineering studies, archaeological studies and the completion of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's response action plan are also necessary to move forward.

The rail corridor is an area spanning 14 acres and is bordered by existing rail lines, the Mississippi River and Irvine Avenue. The vacant area was once an industrial site, with utilities, gas stations, a bulk oil plant and a coal gasification plant located there. More recently, the city purchased the property in 2003 to install a sewer system.

The Saint Paul Port Authority was contracted by the city last summer to assist in planning potential redevelopment of the corridor.

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The council meeting will be held on Tuesday because of the Labor Day holiday on Monday. The meeting is at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 317 Fourth St. NW.

Related Topics: BEMIDJI CITY COUNCIL
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