SUBSCRIBE NOW Just 99¢ for your first month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Judge blocks COVID-19 vaccine rule for health workers in 10 states

The ruling applied in the 10 states that brought the case, including North Dakota and South Dakota.

111321.op.wct.AmericanOpinion.mandates.02.jpg
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus Oct. 14, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images/TNS)
TNS
We are part of The Trust Project.

WASHINGTON -- A federal judge on Monday, Nov. 29, blocked in 10 states a Biden administration vaccine requirement, finding the agency that issued the rule mandating health care workers get vaccinated against the coronavirus likely exceeded its authority.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp in St. Louis prevents the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from enforcing its vaccine mandate for health care workers until the court can hear legal challenges brought by the 10 states.

The ruling is the second legal setback for the Biden administration's requirements aimed at increasing the use of vaccines to halt the COVID-19 pandemic. A federal appeals court in New Orleans earlier this month blocked a sweeping workplace mandate that requires businesses with at least 100 employees to get their staff vaccinated or tested weekly.

Republican state attorneys general sued the administration in early November over the CMS rule, seeking to block the requirement because they alleged it would worsen health care staffing shortages.

Schelp said CMS had significantly understated the burden of its mandate on the ability of health care facilities to provide proper care.

ADVERTISEMENT

Schelp's ruling applied in the 10 states that brought the case: Missouri, Nebraska, Arkansas, Kansas, Iowa, Wyoming, Alaska, South Dakota, North Dakota and New Hampshire.

On Nov. 4, CMS issued the interim final rule it said covers over 10 million people and applies to around 76,000 health care providers including hospitals, nursing homes and dialysis centers.

Providers that fail to comply with the mandate could lose access to Medicare and Medicaid funds. Medicare serves people 65 and older and the disabled. Medicaid serves the poor.

What to read next
The call for an investigation comes after reports that Sen. Omar Fateh carried legislation for a group that endorsed him and a campaign volunteer was convicted in federal court.
Roughly 667,000 Minnesotans could receive the checks if they apply. And the state expected to start sending them out beginning in September.
Here's a look at what happened in the final weekend of the legislative session and what could happen next.
Mayor Chris Swanson has until May 31 to resign. If he does not, a recall election will be scheduled for August.