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Jay Arbie Johnson, 86

Jay Arbie Johnson, 86, of Bemidji, formerly of East Grand Forks, Minn., died on Sunday, April 1, 2007, at Havenwood Care Center in Bemidji. A funeral will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday at the Cease Family Funeral Home of Bemidji with Rev. Hyle And...

Jay Arbie Johnson, 86, of Bemidji, formerly of East Grand Forks, Minn., died on Sunday, April 1, 2007, at Havenwood Care Center in Bemidji.

A funeral will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday at the Cease Family Funeral Home of Bemidji with Rev. Hyle Anderson officiating. A visitation will be held one hour prior to the service on Friday at the funeral home. Burial will be in Evergreen Cemetery in Bemidji.

He was born on June 29, 1920, to Alfred and Caroline Johnson, in Newfolden, Minn., the youngest of five siblings. He graduated from the Newfolden High School in 1938 and attended the University of North Dakota from 1938-1941. A World War II veteran, he was in the U.S. Army Air Corps from 1941-1945 and participated in the China-India-Burma Theater, serving as an air traffic controller. He was the manager of the Farmers Cooperative Marketing Association (FARMSCO) grain elevator in East Grand Forks for more than 40 years.

He was also an avid sportsman, enjoying hunting and fishing. He married Florence Elvegard of Grand Forks, N.D, on Feb. 16, 1942, in Glendale, Calif. They were married for 62 years until she died on Dec. 15, 2004.

He is survived by his son, Kent (Cathy) Johnson of Denver, Colo.; daughters, Carol (Richard) Olson of Grand Forks and Debra (Roger) Cook of Denver; and seven grandchildren.

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He was preceded in death by his parents; sisters, Eva Streeter, Eunice Karvonen and Irene Wilimek; brother, Wallace Johnson; and one grandson.

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