ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Great River Rescue to host annual Furr Bowl Fundraiser

Great River Rescue will host its annual Furr Bowl Fundraiser from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 30, at Bemidji Bowl, 3455 Laurel Drive NW.

3951021+Great River Rescue.jpg
We are part of The Trust Project.

BEMIDJI — Great River Rescue will host its annual Furr Bowl Fundraiser from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 30, at Bemidji Bowl, 3455 Laurel Drive NW.

The family friendly event costs $35 per person with up to six people per team and includes two hours of bowling, pizza, pop and prizes, a release said. A raffle will be held to support the organization.

Registrants and other supporters are also encouraged to start their own crowdfunding page to help reach the $10,000 fundraising goal. Top fundraisers will win specially designed pins from the artists of Gallery North, and the top fundraiser will win a Pit Boss Wood Pellet Grill valued at $225, the release said.

Current sponsors include Paul Bunyan Communications (Event Sponsor), Team Industries of Bagley, First National Bank Bemidji, Ace on the Lake (Team Sponsors), The Pickett Agency, Amity Graphics, Beltrami Electric Cooperative, and Marco (Lane Sponsors).

Space is limited and those interested are encouraged to register early. Registration forms can be found at the shelter or online at greatriverrescue.com.

ADVERTISEMENT

Great River Rescue, located at 1612 Carr Lake Road, is a non-profit organization and was established in 1977 as the Beltrami Humane Society. More than 12,000 animals have been adopted from the shelter. Functioning as a no-kill shelter, it can house up to 45 cats and 25 dogs and maintains a waiting list of animals to be surrendered, the release said.

The shelter is open from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturdays. Executive Director Mustful can be reached at director@greatriverrescue.com or (218) 751-7910.

What to read next
The gas station, which opened in 1934, was the last in the United States that used hand, known as gravity, pumps. It was a Standard Oil Station from 1934 to 1959, then was privately owned after the main route to Watertown, South Dakota, was changed and the car and truck traffic dwindled.
The EA outlines potential alternatives for the use or discontinued use of aerially applied herbicides on Complex lands.
In the eight days of data provided by the South Dakota Highway Patrol, troopers reported three fatalities and 66 injuries across 53 crashes.