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Food summit is this weekend in Red Lake

RED LAKE--"A Year in the Life of a Seed"; "Food is Medicine"; "Decolonizing the Diet." Those are a handful of seminars scheduled at the third-annual food summit this Friday and Saturday at Red Lake Nation College. Organized by 4-Directions Develo...

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During a cooking class, Maizie White demonstrated how to make a kale watermelon salad Friday during the Great Lakes Intertribal Food Summit held at Red Lake Nation College. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

RED LAKE-"A Year in the Life of a Seed"; "Food is Medicine"; "Decolonizing the Diet."

Those are a handful of seminars scheduled at the third-annual food summit this Friday and Saturday at Red Lake Nation College. Organized by 4-Directions Development, the summit highlights indigenous foods, agricultural practices, and broader issues such as "food sovereignty."

It's designed to encourage individual band members to produce their own food and bring to them the resources they might need to do it, said Michael VanHorn, the foods coordinator for the Gitigaanike-"raising a garden"-Foods Initiative at 4-Directions.

More individual food producers can mean fewer health issues, such as diabetes, and market opportunities because band members could sell the food they grow, VanHorn said.

Most of the seminars are scheduled Friday, as are a breakfast, lunch, dinner, and a welcome ceremony. Saturday features a swathe of outdoor food demonstrations and samples, plus an obstacle course on the powwow grounds near the tribal college.

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The summit is free to Red Lake band members and $75 for non-members. That price includes the three meals on Friday.

Tickets: (218) 679-1460 or www.4directionsdevelopment.com .

Related Topics: RED LAKEEDUCATION
Joe Bowen is an award-winning reporter at the Duluth News Tribune. He covers schools and education across the Northland.

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