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Cloud, others represent LLTC at national conference

MINNEAPOLIS--Leech Lake Tribal College student Anita Cloud recently represented the school at a gathering of more than 1,800 Native American scientists mathematicians and engineers at the American Indian Science and Engineering Society national c...

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Pictured is Anita Cloud with American Indian Science and Engineering Society leader Rick Jackson. (Submitted photo)

MINNEAPOLIS-Leech Lake Tribal College student Anita Cloud recently represented the school at a gathering of more than 1,800 Native American scientists mathematicians and engineers at the American Indian Science and Engineering Society national conference held Nov. 9-12 in Minneapolis.
Cloud received a fourth-place research award out of 86 submissions to American Indian Science and Engineering Society for her research work in the summer of 2016 and poster presentation. The work was done under the tutelage of LLTC grad Sheila Northbird in which they compared the impacts of growth and distribution of wild ginger, a traditional food and medicinal for Anishinaabe people, in blown down and undisturbed areas of the Chippewa National Forest . Cloud, who lives in Cass Lake, plans on studying environmental science at BSU or earth systems science at the University of Minnesota. Other students who attended the conference were Adriana Kingbird, Josh Singleton, Thea Ogema, Katie Gould and Chris Stauffer.MINNEAPOLIS-Leech Lake Tribal College student Anita Cloud recently represented the school at a gathering of more than 1,800 Native American scientists mathematicians and engineers at the American Indian Science and Engineering Society national conference held Nov. 9-12 in Minneapolis.
Cloud received a fourth-place research award out of 86 submissions to American Indian Science and Engineering Society for her research work in the summer of 2016 and poster presentation. The work was done under the tutelage of LLTC grad Sheila Northbird in which they compared the impacts of growth and distribution of wild ginger, a traditional food and medicinal for Anishinaabe people, in blown down and undisturbed areas of the Chippewa National Forest .Cloud, who lives in Cass Lake, plans on studying environmental science at BSU or earth systems science at the University of Minnesota. Other students who attended the conference were Adriana Kingbird, Josh Singleton, Thea Ogema, Katie Gould and Chris Stauffer.

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Pictured is Anita Cloud at the American Indian Science and Engineering Society national conference held Nov. 9-12 in Minneapolis. (Submitted photo)

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