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Bemidji in Bloom photos needed

Have you taken a great photo that you think would represent Bemidji at the national level of the America in Bloom program.? The Bemidji in Bloom committee is asking local residents to submit photos for consideration by May 20. Ten photos will be ...

Have you taken a great photo that you think would represent Bemidji at the national level of the America in Bloom program.?

The Bemidji in Bloom committee is asking local residents to submit photos for consideration by May 20. Ten photos will be selected. Selections must represent the eight categories of the program which include floral displays, landscaped areas, environmental effort, community involvement, turf and groundcovers, urban forestry, tidiness and heritage.

The photos selected will be featured in the Bemidji in Bloom insert of the Pioneer on June 22 and at the Awards Banquet at the America in Bloom National Symposium in Columbus, Ohio in October.

Ideas include action photos of children, families or seniors involved in community projects such as planting flowers or trees, picking up litter or participating in environment projects. Consider photos of the downtown planters, business landscaping, front yard gardens or heritage events you attended.

Registration forms can be found on the City of Bemidji Web site at www.ci.bemidji.mn.us or are available at City Hall.

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The America in Bloom Web site at americaninbloom.org has been updated and now includes links to resources for information in each of the eight judged categories. A section on "Best Ideas from Communities" lists a number of ideas from Bemidji's program.

The participant section lists the following cities in the 10,000 to 15,000 population category: Bemidji; Bexley, Ironton, and Tipp City, Ohio; Greenville, Wis.; and Warrenville, Ill. Northfield, Minn., is a new entry in the 15,000 to 25,000 population category.

Look at the America in Bloom Web site for ideas on how you can participate in the program.

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