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Bemidji Civil Air Patrol to host wreath-laying ceremony

BEMIDJI -- The Northland Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol again this year will work to ensure all veterans laid to rest at Greenwood Cemetery in Bemidji are honored this December on National Wreaths Across America Day.

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BEMIDJI -- The Northland Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol again this year will work to ensure all veterans laid to rest at Greenwood Cemetery in Bemidji are honored this December on National Wreaths Across America Day.

This year, the ceremony, held simultaneously across the country at more than 1,000 locations, will be at 11 a.m. Dec. 17 at Greenwood Cemetery, 1903 Bemidji Ave. N. The goal is to place a live, balsam fir wreath at the headstone of every veteran buried there and say each person’s name so their memory lives on, organizers said in a release.

Through November, volunteers will be working to sponsor the wreaths needed to honor every veteran at the cemetery. Each wreath sponsorship costs $15, with $5 of it going to support Bemidji’s Civil Air Patrol.

There are two ways to order a wreath for a veteran, either online or by mail. Order online at www.wreathsacrossamerica.org . Click on “Sponsor Locally,” then “Find a Location,” add Bemidji’s zip code: 56601 and click on “MNGRCE – Greenwood Cemetery, Bemidji.” Place your order by Saturday to ensure wreath. Send $15, with checks made out to MN WING CAP, Northland Composite Squadron, 4130 Hangar Drive NW, Bemidji, MN 56601. Mailed orders, with the name of the veteran honored, must be received by today.

For more information, or to donate, visit www.WreathsAcrossAmerica.org .

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