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Beginner gets hole in one on his second round of golf

MAYVILLE, N.D. -- Dean Klinkau played golf for the first time Saturday. On Sunday, he made a hole-in-one. His initial reaction to this rare feat? Nonchalance.

MAYVILLE, N.D. -- Dean Klinkau played golf for the first time Saturday. On Sunday, he made a hole-in-one. His initial reaction to this rare feat? Nonchalance.

"Is this some big deal in America?" he asked upon seeing the reaction of his playing partners after his ball -- a red-striped driving range ball -- flew into the cup on the par-3, 142-yard No. 3 hole at the Mayville Golf Club.

Klinkau is an 18-year-old foreign exchange student from Solingen, Germany, at Mayville-Portland-Clifford-Galesburg High School. He never had touched a golf club until last week. His ace came on second par-3 hole he had ever played, and the 11th hole overall.

The other members of his foursome weren't watching when he hit the ball on No. 3 with a 3-wood. "Dean said, 'I think it went in.' He said it like he couldn't care less," said Kalle Onsjo, a foreign exchange from Sweden and an accomplished golfer.

Disbelieving, Onsjo ran down the hill to discover the range ball in the hole. "We jumped around, got all excited and told Dean he had just made a hole-in-one," Onsjo said. "Dean said, 'That's nice.' He didn't know what he had done."

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Klinkau said the ball went off the flagstick, directly into the hole, what's called a "slam dunk" in golfing language.

His best score on the other 16 holes he has played in his lifetime is a six. On Saturday, he and Onsjo skipped the No. 3 hole because the course was busy. The other par-3 on Mayville's course is 210 yards, too far for a beginner golfer to reach. So, Klinkau basically made a hole-in-one on his first legitimate opportunity.

Osa Donovan and Chris Grandalen, high school seniors, were the other witnesses to the ace, the 71st all-time at Mayville Golf Club, which opened in 1969. Klinkau's name was put on the clubhouse plaques with the previous 70.

"When I saw those plaques, I understood it's a big deal," he said. "Before, I figured a lot of golfers got those."

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