ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Applications for Washington, D.C. Youth Tour due Feb. 25

Beltrami Electric Cooperative is accepting applications from eligible high school juniors who will be seniors in fall 2022 to attend the 56th annual Washington, D.C. Youth Tour set for June 14-19.

2022 Youth Tour.png
Beltrami Electric Cooperative is seeking applications from eligible high school juniors to attend the 56th annual Washington, D.C. Youth Tour set for June 14-19.
Contributed

BEMIDJI — Beltrami Electric Cooperative is accepting applications from eligible high school juniors who will be seniors in fall 2022 to attend the 56th annual Washington, D.C. Youth Tour set for June 14-19.

Each year, rural electric cooperatives across the nation sponsor roughly 1,900 students on the Rural Electric Youth Tour to Washington, D.C.

The trip gives young people the opportunity to watch history come alive, explore museums, memorials and monuments, make friendships that will last a lifetime and be part of a group that has more than 50,000 alumni in every walk of life, including U.S. Senators and CEOs, a release said.

BEC's winner will travel with approximately 40 Minnesota teens sponsored by other rural electric co-ops to Washington, D.C.

Students have until Friday, Feb. 25, to apply. To qualify, candidates must submit an application, essay and two letters of reference from teachers, group or community leaders and have a parent or guardian who is a member of Beltrami Electric Cooperative.

ADVERTISEMENT

Students can find an application at their school counselor’s office or online at www.beltramielectric.com .

For more information, call Angela Lyseng at (218) 444-3689 .

Related Topics: THINGS TO DO
What To Read Next
Mike Clemens, a farmer from Wimbledon, North Dakota, was literally (and figuratively) “blown away,” when his equipment shed collapsed under a snow load.
Wanda Patsche, new Farm Camp director, has farmed with her husband near I-90 in southern Minnesota since the 1970s and shares her passion for farming on her blog.
The University of Minnesota has been researching the effects of dough fermentation and wheat variety in creating bread that is easier to digest.