From eerie historic hotels to creepy tuberculosis hospitals, Minnesota possesses its fair share of supposed ghosts and supernatural creatures.

It's Halloween, and in celebration of the spooky holiday, here are seven hair-raising and spine-tingling reportedly haunted places around the state.

Big Winnie Resort and General Store, Bena

Located along U.S. Highway 2 in Bena, the Big Winnie Resort and General Store is a hotbed for the paranormal, and it hasn’t gone unnoticed by those who shop and work under its roof.

“Employees have always noticed talking in the store, footsteps going up and down stairs and the smell of my grandmother's perfume,” owner Arnold Dahl said in an Oct. 2019 interview with the Pioneer.

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The general store is a federally recognized Historical Landmark, but the owners said unusual activity also spans beyond the store and onto their land, where there are remnants of a German prisoner-of-war camp from World War II.

“A paranormal group came out and did an investigation and caught images of floating orbs where the camp was....,” Dahl said.

Palmer House Hotel, Sauk Centre

The Palmer House Hotel in Sauk Centre has long been considered one of the most haunted places in Minnesota. Built in 1901, the historic hotel has treated guests and staff members to a lengthy laundry list of paranormal occurrences over the years.

There are numerous accounts of furniture rearranging itself, guests hearing and feeling a ghostly cat jumping into their bed, extreme temperature changes, items thrown by an invisible force, and ghostly children playing in hallways.

In fact, the Palmer House Hotel has been the site of many paranormal investigations, including a visit from the Travel Channel’s “Ghost Adventures” crew. During the investigation, the crew documented multiple instances of EVPs, or electronic voice phenomena.

Greyhound Bus Museum, Hibbing

The Greyhound Bus Museum in Hibbing is rumored to be haunted, and there have been reported cases of bus windows opening and closing on their own. (Duluth News Tribune)
The Greyhound Bus Museum in Hibbing is rumored to be haunted, and there have been reported cases of bus windows opening and closing on their own. (Duluth News Tribune)

While Hibbing is the birthplace of the Greyhound Bus Line, it’s also home to The Greyhound Bus Museum, which is said to have active spirits roaming throughout its displays.

There have been reports of bus windows opening and closing on their own, as well as reports of missing and moved objects, strange shadows and unexplained voices, especially that of a little girl.

St. James Hotel, Red Wing

The St. James Hotel’s Victorian Dining Room is reputed to have paranormal activity. Paranormal investigator Adrian Lee says he has seen the hefty walnut table in the center of the room, known as Clara’s table, move on its own. (RiverTowns)
The St. James Hotel’s Victorian Dining Room is reputed to have paranormal activity. Paranormal investigator Adrian Lee says he has seen the hefty walnut table in the center of the room, known as Clara’s table, move on its own. (RiverTowns)

Overlooking the Mississippi River, the St. James Hotel in Red Wing has a spooky past that makes itself known to some unsuspecting guests who dare to stay there.

In 1890, the St. James hotel was used as a morgue to house the bodies of passengers who drowned in a shipwreck on nearby Lake Pepin.

Today, the spirits of the drowned passengers are said to still reside in the St. James, along with the hotel’s former owner -- and resident ghost -- Clara Lillyblad.

She reportedly likes to make sure table settings are correctly arranged in the hotel’s dining room, and she also tends to make her presence known on the third floor, where she lived until her death.

Guests and staff members have also reported slamming doors, cold spots, and hearing crying babies that aren’t there.

Nopeming Sanatorium, Duluth

Built in 1912 to serve as a quarantine and treatment center for patients with tuberculosis, the Nopeming Sanatorium in Duluth is said to be overridden by the spirits of those who perished within its walls.

Nopeming now stands dilapidated and vacant, but paranormal investigators report the spirit of a little girl to be the most popular presence there.

However, there are other reports of Native American spirits on the grounds, as well as those from a 1940 murder-suicide in which a man killed an orderly and then himself on Mother's Day.

Nopeming Sanatorium is also another Minnesota location visited by the Travel Channel’s "Ghost Adventures" crew. During their investigation, the team discovered disembodied voices and documented various door slams and tugs from unseen forces.

Wabasha Street Caves, St. Paul

With ties to the Prohibition era, it’s no surprise that the Wabasha Street Caves in St. Paul is reportedly haunted by gangsters.

The event hall, which was built into the sandstone caves located on the south shore of the Mississippi River, was once run as a speakeasy and is said to have hosted a number of famous outlaws, including John Dillinger and Ma Baker.

It is also said that during the caves’ speakeasy days, three gangsters were murdered there and buried under its cement floors.

The Wabasha Street Caves are set to permanently close Nov. 30. But previously, they hosted historic tours and swing nights, and guests reported seeing apparitions and hearing phantom music. There were also reports of a ghostly bartender who would refill empty wine glasses.

Wendigo Territory, Roseau

The town of Roseau in northern Minnesota is said to be Wendigo territory. Submitted photo.
The town of Roseau in northern Minnesota is said to be Wendigo territory. Submitted photo.

From the 1800s to the 1920s, there were reported sightings of a Wendigo in Roseau. The sightings came to be known as an omen of death and disaster, as after each one, an unexpected death followed.

Originating from Native American legend, the supernatural creature -- whose name means an “evil spirit that devours mankind” -- is said to roam the frozen forests of Minnesota, the Great Lakes region and the central regions of Canada in search of human flesh.

While descriptions of the creature vary, the Wendigo is generally said to be at least 15 feet tall and severely emaciated, having glowing eyes and long fangs and claws.

According to legend, a Wendigo’s hunger is never satiated, and it’s in constant search of its next victim.