John Wheeler

John Wheeler

Meteorologist

John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..

Wheeler covers weather for WDAY TV and radio, as well as for The Forum and for inforum.com. Most meteorologists find stormy and extreme weather fascinating and Wheeler is no exception, but his biggest interest is severe winter weather.

Temperatures at weather stations all across the Dakotas and Minnesota, even as far south as Rochester, recorded temperatures well into the -40s.
This oddity is very important to life on Earth as we know it.
Severe storms and tornadoes are a regular part of the climatology of the southeastern part of the United States in winter.
A 10-degree difference is the same difference, no matter where it is on the temperature scale.
The Accumulated Cyclone Energy index this season was 22% lower than average.
A lava flow from the now-erupting volcano has cut power to the site.
Temperature inversions, when a layer of warm air aloft covers cooler air below, are much more common during winter.
Water content, snow temperature and low humidity all slowed the snow melt.
When water is evaporating in summer the air temperature is certainly not 212 degrees.
England's worst storm on record may well have been the Great Storm of 1703.