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U.S. SUPREME COURT

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WE Health Clinic has seen more out-of-state patients than in the past, and St. Luke's OB-GYN Jennifer Boyle said several patients have cited the Supreme Count rulings as reasons for wanting their tubes tied or birth control.
Experts warn that simply claiming the benefits may create paper trails for law enforcement officials in states criminalizing abortion. That will complicate life for the dozens of corporations promising to protect, or even expand, the abortion benefits for employees and their dependents.
Jackson, 51, joins the liberal bloc of a court with a 6-3 conservative majority. Her swearing in as President Joe Biden's replacement for retiring liberal Justice Stephen Breyer came six days after the court overturned the 1973 Roe v. Wade landmark that legalized abortion nationwide. Breyer, at 83 the court's oldest member, officially retired on Thursday.
The court's 6-3 ruling constrained the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing coal- and gas-fired power plants under the landmark Clean Air Act anti-pollution law. Biden's administration is currently working on new regulations.
Jackson, 51, was confirmed by the Senate on April 7. Breyer, 83, has served on the court since 1994 and announced his plans to retire in January. Breyer will officially retire and Jackson will take her two oaths of office at noon on Thursday shortly after the court issues the last of its rulings of its current term.
The sweeping ruling by the court, with a 6-3 conservative majority, was set to alter American life, with nearly half the states considered certain or likely to ban abortion.

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The Northland’s only abortion clinic is readying for an influx of patients. Abortion is no longer legal in South Dakota, North Dakota and Wisconsin.
South Dakota is one of 13 states with what's known as a trigger law, meaning the state enacts an abortion ban under its own authority when the Supreme Court overturns its 1973 Roe v. Wade decision.
Minnesota could become an island for abortion access in the Midwest in the wake of Supreme Court decision on abortion.

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