BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — “Once Upon a Time … In Hollywood,” Quentin Tarantino’s ode to 1970s-era Los Angeles, emerged as the big winner at the 77th Golden Globe Awards on Sunday, Jan. 5, taking home three trophies, for best musical or comedy, screenplay and supporting actor.

Overall, it was a night when the Hollywood establishment pushed back against the streaming services that have arrived on the film scene. Sam Mendes’ “1917,” a World War I epic that does not arrive in wide release in theaters until Friday, was named best drama, and Mendes received the trophy for best director.

“I hope this means that people will turn up and see this on the big screen, the way it was intended,” Mendes said from the stage in an unsubtle swipe at Netflix.

It was a humiliating evening for Netflix. The streaming giant went into the ceremony with a leading 34 nods, including six for Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story,” more than for any film, and five for Martin Scorsese’ “The Irishman.” But Netflix left with only two trophies: Laura Dern collected the Globe for her supporting role in “Marriage Story” and Olivia Colman (“The Crown”) was named best actress in a television drama.

Amazon and Hulu each took home a pair of awards, with “Fleabag” (Amazon) voted best TV comedy. But Apple TV Plus was shut out completely.

In contrast, HBO converted four of its 15 nominations into wins, including Globes for best drama (the soapy media family series “Succession”) and best limited series (“Chernobyl”). Sony Pictures, the studio behind “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” was the big winner among film companies.

The ceremony began on a frothy and obscene note, as the returning host, the British comedian Ricky Gervais, cracked numerous jokes that were bleeped by NBC censors. He mocked Joe Pesci by likening him to Baby Yoda, cracked an extremely vulgar joke that involved the “Cats” star Judi Dench licking herself, poked fun at Hollywood’s focus on diversity and pronounced that “no one cares about movies anymore.”

The night’s first award amounted to a showdown between old and new Hollywood, with HBO’s Bill Hader (“Barry”) going up against Hulu’s Ramy Youssef, the Egyptian-American star of the little-seen “Ramy,” for best actor in a TV musical or comedy. Youssef won.

“Look, I know you guys haven’t seen my show,” he said from the stage, to polite laughter in the star-studded ballroom.

Phoebe Waller-Bridge (“Fleabag”) collected the Globe for best actress in a television musical or comedy. “Thank you for picking up this little scrap of a show,” she said to Amazon, which runs the series on its streaming service. The show also won best musical or comedy.

Jared Harris was expected to collect the Globe for best actor in a limited series for his “Chernobyl” scientist, but the award went to Russell Crowe (Showtime’s “The Loudest Voice”), who skipped the ceremony amid wildfires in his native Australia. Jennifer Aniston, presenting the award with Reese Witherspoon, read from a statement from Crowe, which read, “Make no mistake, the tragedy unfolding in Australia is climate-change based.”

The proceedings grew increasingly serious as the night went on. Michelle Williams, accepting the Globe for best actress in a miniseries, made an impassioned plea for women to vote. “Please vote in your own self-interests,” Williams said. “It’s what men have been doing for years, which is why the world looks so much like them.”

Patricia Arquette, winning for her supporting role in the Hulu limited series “The Act,” offered a stern dose of reality, reminding everyone that, among other things, America was “on the brink of war” and that President Donald Trump had tweeted about destroying Iranian cultural sites earlier in the night.

Nothing is certain when it comes to the Globes, but Renée Zellweger was as close to a sure thing as it gets. She won best actress in a drama for her heartbreaking portrayal of a middle-aged Judy Garland in “Judy.” On the men’s side, Joaquin Phoenix won for his demented transformation in “Joker.” “I cannot believe you put up with me,” he said from the stage to the director Todd Phillips.

Eddie Murphy was the favorite to win best comedic actor for playing a struggling comedian who comes up with a blaxploitation hit in Netflix’s “Dolemite Is My Name.” In a surprise, Taron Egerton (“Rocketman,” released by Paramount Pictures) was called to the stage. A flummoxed Egerton thanked his mother — “This one’s for you” — and Elton John, whom he played in the film: “Thank you for living a life less ordinary.” Awkwafina won best actress in a musical or comedy for “The Farewell.”

In recent years, stars like Oprah Winfrey and Meryl Streep have appeared on the Globes stage to accept lifetime achievement awards and have unleashed cris de coeur about politics and sexual harassment. This time around, the foreign press association seemed to make a statement about a need for niceness. The lifetime achievement honorees were Tom Hanks and Ellen DeGeneres, both of whom are more known for uniting than dividing.

It was a good night for HBO. “Chernobyl” won best limited series and “Succession,” the network’s deliriously well-reviewed drama about a feuding media dynasty, won the best TV drama prize. One thank-you stood out: Jesse Armstrong, the “Succession” showrunner, name-checked Richard Plepler, the former HBO chief who recently announced he would be working exclusively for Apple TV Plus.

Apple, which is hoping to become a player on the awards scene, had two chances in the best actress in a drama category. Aniston and her “Morning Show” castmate Witherspoon were both nominated. But Olivia Colman won for her stiff-upper-lip portrayal of Queen Elizabeth II on Netflix’s “The Crown.”

“I already got a little bit boozy because I didn’t think this was going to happen,” Colman said.

Here are the winning films, TV shows, actors and production teams at the 2020 Golden Globe Awards.

MOVIES

Best Motion Picture, Drama: “1917”

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy: “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood”

Best Director, Motion Picture: Sam Mendes, “1917”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama: Renée Zellweger, “Judy”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy: Awkwafina, “The Farewell”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture: Laura Dern, “Marriage Story”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama: Joaquin Phoenix, “Joker”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy: Taron Egerton, “Rocketman”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture: Brad Pitt, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood”

Best Screenplay, Motion Picture: Quentin Tarantino, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood”

Best Original Score, Motion Picture: Hildur Gudnadottir, “Joker”

Best Original Song, Motion Picture: “I’m Gonna Love Me Again” — “Rocketman”

Best Motion Picture, Animated: “Missing Link”

Best Motion Picture, Foreign Language: “Parasite” (South Korea)

TELEVISION

Best Television Series, Drama: “Succession”

Best Television Series, Musical or Comedy: “Fleabag”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: “Chernobyl”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Drama: Olivia Colman, “The Crown”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series, Musical or Comedy: Phoebe Waller-Bridge, “Fleabag”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television: Michelle Williams, “Fosse/Verdon”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: Patricia Arquette, “The Act”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Drama: Brian Cox, “Succession”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series, Musical or Comedy: Ramy Youssef, “Ramy”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television: Russell Crowe, “The Loudest Voice”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television: Stellan Skarsgard, “Chernobyl”