Netflix, touting the success of its original programming, said the most popular releases on its streaming service this year were things it produced: the comedy movie "Murder Mystery" and the third season of its 1980s sci-fi show "Stranger Things."

The company on Monday, Dec. 30, disclosed lists of its top 10 programs in 33 countries, offering the most expansive report to date of what is being watched on the world's most popular online TV network.

Netflix's "6 Underground," the Michael Bay-directed action movie, and its monster-hunting fantasy "The Witcher" also drew large U.S. audiences.

Netflix, which once filled its service with shows and movies from other studios, is now relying more than ever on its own programming to keep viewers loyal. Partners such as Walt Disney Co. are taking back their properties to feed their own streaming services. Disney's platform launched last month, and ones from Comcast Corp.'s NBCUniversal and AT&T Inc.'s WarnerMedia are due next year.

Netflix still relied on some Disney material to fill out its lineup this year. In fact, "Incredibles 2," the animated movie from Disney's Pixar unit, was Netflix's third-most-popular new film in 2019.

The data is both revealing and limited. No outside party verified the lists, which Netflix based on viewership in the first 28 days after a show was released. The numbers count people who watched at least two minutes of a program, and Netflix relied on projections to calculate the popularity of shows and movies that were just released in December.

Because Netflix has provided so little data over the years, the lists offer some rare insight into what works on the service.

Netflix's original movies and shows dominated across every category in both the U.S. and abroad. "Murder Mystery," which stars Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston, was the No. 1 program in nine countries, including Australia and Colombia.

The third season of heist show "Casa de Papel," meanwhile, topped the charts in six countries, including Spain and Israel.

This article was written by Lucas Shaw, a reporter for The Washington Post.