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'Spicey With the Stars?': Former White House spokesman being courted for show

Outgoing White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer waves as he walks into the White House in Washington, U.S., July 21, 2017. REUTERS

WASHINGTON - So... does Sean Spicer know how to samba?

Now that the outgoing press secretary's days of tap dancing around tough questions in the White House press room have come to an end, word is that his next gig might be quite a change of pace: Spicer is apparently being courted as a celebrity contestant on ABC's "Dancing With the Stars," the New York Post first reported.

Other outlets also have cited unnamed sources as claiming that the reality competition show - in which celebrities are partnered with professional dancers and compete in a range of dance styles - has expressed interest in Spicer. But there has been no official confirmation from ABC or from Spicer: "We'll announce our Season 25 cast closer to our premiere date, Sept. 18," a DWTS spokesperson told USA Today.

Spicer wouldn't be the first political type to compete on the show - and his predecessors haven't exactly set a high bar.

For instance: former Republican House majority leader Tom DeLay, who definitely did not wow the judges when he competed in 2009; he had to quit the show after suffering stress fractures in his feet. Conservative pundit Tucker Carlson's stint on the show was over practically as soon as it began in 2010: He was the first contestant eliminated after he stiffly struggled through a cha-cha-cha with partner, Elena Grinenko. (Carlson offered up a bit of self-deprecating humor after the whole episode was over, describing Grinenko's attempts to teach him how to dance as "Einstein teaching addition to a slow child.")

And Energy Secretary Rick Perry didn't do much better when he competed last year. He was voted off in the second week of the competition, after the judges awarded him the lowest score of the night.

So if history is any indication, Spicer's stint on the dance floor could be even shorter than his time in the Trump White House - but, on the other hand, it wouldn't take much to vastly outshine those who went before him.

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