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Weather: Average April contradicts above normal March

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Weather: Average April contradicts above normal March
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619

By now you're likely tired of hearing about how bizarre our weather was in March. But as we near the end of April another reminder has appeared.


Average April temperatures in the north woods are likely to be just slightly warmer than temperatures were in March.

According to records compiled by the Minnesota Climatology Working Group, so far the average high temperature in April is 53 and the average low is 31, or about normal. These numbers are approximately 2 degrees warmer than the averages for March of this year.

Typically, April high temperatures are 17 degrees warmer than those for March and low temperatures are 14 degrees warmer.

Temperatures for the upcoming week should continue to trend around seasonal norms. Highs should be around 60 and lows will average around 40.

Other areas around the country are not seeing normal temperatures.

Earlier this week, temperatures in west Texas reached mid-summer levels. Lubbock topped out at 104 and Childress literally sizzled at 108 - both record highs for the month of April.

On the other end of the weather scale, higher elevation areas of West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania generally saw 4-6 inches of snow. The snow champ was Laurel Summit, Penn., where nearly two feet was recorded. A disaster emergency was declared across western areas of Pennsylvania where the snow closed schools and caused power outages.

Snow is possible in parts of Minnesota today. A band of light to moderate snow could develop from north of Fargo and extend southeastward through the state into northern Iowa. Generally, 1-3 inches of very slushy accumulations are possible.

It is possible that localized bands of 2-4 inches may occur.

Given that the sun is currently as high in the sky as it is in late August, don't look for any of that snow to stick around for more than a day.

TOM SIEMERS is the Pioneer's circulation director.

Pioneer staff reports