Sections

Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement
Rob Babcock, assistant general manager of the Minnesota Timberwolves NBA team, spoke to students at Red Lake Elementary School Thursday about the importance of reading. Babcock also spoke with students at Red Lake Middle School and High School and Saint Mary's Mission School. He speaks to students in Ponemah, grades K-8, school today. Pioneer Photo/Monte Draper

Timberwolves' assistant GM visits Red Lake schools

Email Sign up for Breaking News Alerts
News Bemidji,Minnesota 56619 http://www.bemidjipioneer.com/sites/default/files/styles/square_300/public/fieldimages/1/0806/201009100910-babcock-red-lake.jpg?itok=vJE_if9p
Bemidji Pioneer
(218) 333-9819 customer support
Timberwolves' assistant GM visits Red Lake schools
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619

Wearing athletic pants, a sweatshirt and tennis shoes, Rob Babcock had his "game face" on.

But the assistant general manager with the Minnesota Timberwolves had more than basketball on his mind - he was there to talk schoolwork.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Babcock, most notably remembered as the former general manager of the Toronto Raptors, visited with students from the Red Lake School District and Saint Mary's Mission School in Red Lake on Thursday.

This was Babcock's second visit to Red Lake schools. Today he is scheduled to talk with students in Ponemah.

At Red Lake Elementary School, Babcock held up a poster showing Timberwolves players Kevin Love, Al Jefferson (who now plays for Utah Jazz), Ramon Sessions (who now plays for Cleveland Cavaliers) and Ryan Gomes (who now plays for Los Angeles Clippers).

In the poster, the players had big smiles on their faces and each held a book in their hands. The phrase, "Slam-dunk into books," was scrawled on the top of the poster.

"All these players are very hard workers," Babcock said. "The reason they're playing in the NBA is because they worked very hard to get there. They didn't just sit around and become NBA players."

Babcock went on to talk about how he followed his dream of working in the NBA.

"My dream was to be an NBA player. I got a college scholarship and then played professional leagues outside the country, but I wasn't good enough to be an NBA player," Babcock said. "But while I was chasing my dream, I learned there were things I could do other than making money playing the game."

Eventually, Babcock became a teacher and a high school basketball coach. Later he got a job in the NBA as a scout before eventually becoming a general team manager.

"That's a great dream," he said. "You should dream big. If you want to do something, dream it and go for it. But don't fool yourself; it just doesn't happen for no reason. Nobody just gives it to you."

Babcock encouraged the students to read. Towards the end of his 15-minute talk, he asked several trivia questions which students could answer for a free book.

Chris Jourdain, school wellness counselor for Red Lake School District, coordinated Babcock's visit. He said he tried to schedule Babcock's visit this summer for the schools' "Skills and Drills" basketball summer camps, but Babcock wasn't available.

"We were able to work out a time when he could come and speak to the kids," Jourdain said. "It's a nice way to start the school year off right."

After speaking to Red Lake High School students Thursday afternoon, Jourdain facilitated a basketball workshop for youth where he taught team- and skill-building techniques.

Y awilliams@bemidjipioneer.com

Wearing athletic pants, a sweatshirt and tennis shoes, Rob Babcock had his "game face" on.

But the assistant general manager with the Minnesota Timberwolves had more than basketball on his mind - he was there to talk schoolwork.

Babcock, most notably remembered as the former general manager of the Toronto Raptors, visited with students from the Red Lake School District and Saint Mary's Mission School in Red Lake on Thursday.

This was Babcock's second visit to Red Lake schools. Today he is scheduled to talk with students in Ponemah.

At Red Lake Elementary School, Babcock held up a poster showing Timberwolves players Kevin Love, Al Jefferson (who now plays for Utah Jazz), Ramon Sessions (who now plays for Cleveland Cavaliers) and Ryan Gomes (who now plays for Los Angeles Clippers).

In the poster, the players had big smiles on their faces and each held a book in their hands. The phrase, "Slam-dunk into books," was scrawled on the top of the poster.

"All these players are very hard workers," Babcock said. "The reason they're playing in the NBA is because they worked very hard to get there. They didn't just sit around and become NBA players."

Babcock went on to talk about how he followed his dream of working in the NBA.

"My dream was to be an NBA player. I got a college scholarship and then played professional leagues outside the country, but I wasn't good enough to be an NBA player," Babcock said. "But while I was chasing my dream, I learned there were things I could do other than making money playing the game."

Eventually, Babcock became a teacher and a high school basketball coach. Later he got a job in the NBA as a scout before eventually becoming a general team manager.

"That's a great dream," he said. "You should dream big. If you want to do something, dream it and go for it. But don't fool yourself; it just doesn't happen for no reason. Nobody just gives it to you."

Babcock encouraged the students to read. Towards the end of his 15-minute talk, he asked several trivia questions which students could answer for a free book.

Chris Jourdain, school wellness counselor for Red Lake School District, coordinated Babcock's visit. He said he tried to schedule Babcock's visit this summer for the schools' "Skills and Drills" basketball summer camps, but Babcock wasn't available.

"We were able to work out a time when he could come and speak to the kids," Jourdain said. "It's a nice way to start the school year off right."

After speaking to Red Lake High School students Thursday afternoon, Jourdain facilitated a basketball workshop for youth where he taught team- and skill-building techniques.

awilliams@bemidjipioneer.com

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
randomness