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Virginia Spears helps her granddaughter, Whitney Spears, with the finishing touch on a painting while Virginia's great-granddaughter, Jasmine Kingbird, creates her own image during the Cultural Connections Community Celebration Wednesday afternoon at the Lake Bemidji waterfront. Pioneer Photo /Monte Draper

Shared Vision: Cultural Connections moved to waterfront

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News Bemidji,Minnesota 56619 http://www.bemidjipioneer.com/sites/default/files/styles/square_300/public/fieldimages/1/0806/201008190819-cultural-connection-painting.jpg?itok=C6_b0OwU
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Shared Vision: Cultural Connections moved to waterfront
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619

For the last few years, the ACLU Greater Minnesota Racial Justice Project has hosted a community festival at the Lake Irving marina.

This year, the Cultural Connections Community Celebration moved to the Lake Bemidji waterfront and took on a broader scope.

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"This is the first time it's been done here," said Carolyn Jacobs of Shared Vision. "Shared Vision thought of putting it more in community hands. We thought it would fit well with one of our goals, which is to increase cultural understanding and respect."

The event featured a free meal, door prizes, traditional games, fishing, canoe instruction and, for the first time, a farmers' market. Organizations from law enforcement and groups supporting health, nonviolence, the environment and other community resources set up booths in the information tent. Duane and Bambi Goodwin led children in various crafts and games.

And performers provided entertainment in the music tent. Chelsea Annette told Ojibwe stories and Native Era and Native Bro offered hip-hop. Eric Carlson, Annie Humphrey and sisters Sadie and Sarah Hamrin shared folk, Celtic and bluegrass music. Acapella group Baba Yaga provided vocal arrangements. The Bemidji Symphony Orchestra Ensemble played numbers from the legacy tour. And the P-Town Boyz performed traditional singing and drumming.

"It's an opportunity to intentionally bring the community together to build relationships," Jacobs said.

The event was funded in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund appropriated by the state Legislature from the November 2008 vote.

Y mmiron@bemidjipioneer.com

For the last few years, the ACLU Greater Minnesota Racial Justice Project has hosted a community festival at the Lake Irving marina.

This year, the Cultural Connections Community Celebration moved to the Lake Bemidji waterfront and took on a broader scope.

"This is the first time it's been done here," said Carolyn Jacobs of Shared Vision. "Shared Vision thought of putting it more in community hands. We thought it would fit well with one of our goals, which is to increase cultural understanding and respect."

The event featured a free meal, door prizes, traditional games, fishing, canoe instruction and, for the first time, a farmers' market. Organizations from law enforcement and groups supporting health, nonviolence, the environment and other community resources set up booths in the information tent. Duane and Bambi Goodwin led children in various crafts and games.

And performers provided entertainment in the music tent. Chelsea Annette told Ojibwe stories and Native Era and Native Bro offered hip-hop. Eric Carlson, Annie Humphrey and sisters Sadie and Sarah Hamrin shared folk, Celtic and bluegrass music. Acapella group Baba Yaga provided vocal arrangements. The Bemidji Symphony Orchestra Ensemble played numbers from the legacy tour. And the P-Town Boyz performed traditional singing and drumming.

"It's an opportunity to intentionally bring the community together to build relationships," Jacobs said.

The event was funded in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund appropriated by the state Legislature from the November 2008 vote.

mmiron@bemidjipioneer.com

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