Sections

Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement

School districts crunch numbers after being identified as making or not making AYP

Email News Alerts

It's that time of the year again - when schools analyze test scores, graduation rates and attendance records after being notified by the Minnesota Department of Education as to whether or not they made the "AYP list."

Advertisement
Advertisement

All this measuring and analyzing has to be done, however, as there are rules to be followed when dealing with society's future leaders and taxpayer dollars.

Annual Yearly Progress, or AYP, is what the federal government uses to measure schools under the No Child Left Behind Act. NCLB is a federal act that ensures accountability for schools designated as Title 1 and Title III. Basically, the act holds districts accountable for student achievement.

AYP takes the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment - Series II test scores of students and analyzes those test scores within the following groups: all students; American Indian/Alaskan Native students; Asian/Pacific Islander students; Hispanic students; black students not of Hispanic origin; white students not of Hispanic origin; limited English proficient students; special education students and students eligible for free or reduced price meals.

Whether a school makes AYP, is based on math scores, reading scores, graduation rates and attendance rates. All four criteria are used to determine a school district's AYP status. A school or district is identified as either "making AYP" or "not making AYP" based on the AYP components.

NCLB requires 95 percent participation of all students in testing. It also requires 100 percent proficiency and math and reading by 2014 for all students with improvement each year; 90 percent attendance and 80 percent graduation rate.

Bemidji Area School District

Like individual schools, school districts also receive an AYP status each year. Bemidji School District made AYP this year.

The district status is calculated like the school status, except that unlike schools, districts need to meet AYP targets for graduation and attendance, not just one or the other.

Bemidji School District has 31 eligible groups and has met 100 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

The following schools within the district, however, did not make AYP:

Bemidji Middle School did not make AYP in American Indian and special education math and reading proficiency. This is the fifth year in a row BMS has not made AYP.

Bemidji Area Youth Learning and Working did not make AYP in all students' math and reading proficiency. Last year Bemidji BYLaW made AYP.

First City School did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency. This is the second consecutive year First City School has not made AYP.

Northern Elementary School did not make AYP in American Indian math and reading proficiency. Last year Northern made AYP.

TrekNorth Junior- Senior High School

TrekNorth Junior and Senior High School, a public school that houses grades 7-12, did not make AYP this year.

TrekNorth has 14 eligible groups and has met 85.7 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. This is the second time in the school's seven-year history it has not made AYP.

The school district did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency and the free and reduced price lunch student subgroup in math proficiency.

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School, a public school for grades 9-12, did not make AYP this year.

Voyageur's has three eligible groups and has met 33.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

This year, the school did not make AYP in all students' reading proficiency and all students' math proficiency. This is the sixth consecutive year the school has not made AYP.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP four years in a row are identified as in corrective action. These districts must:

E Develop a district improvement plan.

E Set aside and spend 10 percent of the district's Title I allocation on professional development.

E Move no funds between NCLB programs.

The district must set aside a fixed amount of funds to help with the district improvement plan. The Minnesota Department of Education contracts with statewide regional education service cooperatives to provide technical assistance for the development and implementation of district improvement plan.

Schoolcraft Learning Community

Schoolcraft Learning Community, a public school for grades K-9, did not make AYP this year. This is the second year the school has not make AYP since 2003.

Schoolcraft has 15 eligible groups and has met 93.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. The school did not make AYP this year in special education math proficiency.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP two consecutive years in a row are identified as school choice. The district must:

E Set aside up to 20 percent of the amount of Title I funds (or a lesser amount depending on parent demand) to pay for costs of transporting students to a non-identified school.

E Inform parents about available choices.

E Describe the selection process, giving priority to the lowest achieving children from low-income families.

E Notify parents of the results of school selections and transportation availability.

E Determine method and route of transportation.

E Transport students to the newly selected schools.

State level

According to the Minnesota Department of Education, of the 2,291 Minnesota schools earning an AYP status in 2010, 1,060 schools made AYP compared to 1,066 schools in 2009.

There were 1,048 schools that did not make AYP in 2010, which remained the same as in 2009.

Minnesota currently has 342 Title I schools in need of improvement, which will be providing additional options and services to students.

The number of non-proficient students statewide is decreasing.

Other districts:

Blackduck Public School District, Blackduck Secondary, Kelliher Secondary, Red Lake Middle Level Alternative Learning Center, Laporte Secondary, Mahnomen Secondary, Mahnomen Area Learning Center, Waubun Area Learning Programs and Fosston Secondary were among the list of schools in the state that did not make AYP in 2010.

Y awilliams@bemidjipioneer.com

It's that time of the year again - when schools analyze test scores, graduation rates and attendance records after being notified by the Minnesota Department of Education as to whether or not they made the "AYP list."

All this measuring and analyzing has to be done, however, as there are rules to be followed when dealing with society's future leaders and taxpayer dollars.

Annual Yearly Progress, or AYP, is what the federal government uses to measure schools under the No Child Left Behind Act. NCLB is a federal act that ensures accountability for schools designated as Title 1 and Title III. Basically, the act holds districts accountable for student achievement.

AYP takes the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment - Series II test scores of students and analyzes those test scores within the following groups: all students; American Indian/Alaskan Native students; Asian/Pacific Islander students; Hispanic students; black students not of Hispanic origin; white students not of Hispanic origin; limited English proficient students; special education students and students eligible for free or reduced price meals.

Whether a school makes AYP, is based on math scores, reading scores, graduation rates and attendance rates. All four criteria are used to determine a school district's AYP status. A school or district is identified as either "making AYP" or "not making AYP" based on the AYP components.

NCLB requires 95 percent participation of all students in testing. It also requires 100 percent proficiency and math and reading by 2014 for all students with improvement each year; 90 percent attendance and 80 percent graduation rate.

Bemidji Area School District

Like individual schools, school districts also receive an AYP status each year. Bemidji School District made AYP this year.

The district status is calculated like the school status, except that unlike schools, districts need to meet AYP targets for graduation and attendance, not just one or the other.

Bemidji School District has 31 eligible groups and has met 100 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

The following schools within the district, however, did not make AYP:

Bemidji Middle School did not make AYP in American Indian and special education math and reading proficiency. This is the fifth year in a row BMS has not made AYP.

Bemidji Area Youth Learning and Working did not make AYP in all students' math and reading proficiency. Last year Bemidji BYLaW made AYP.

First City School did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency. This is the second consecutive year First City School has not made AYP.

Northern Elementary School did not make AYP in American Indian math and reading proficiency. Last year Northern made AYP.

TrekNorth Junior- Senior High School

TrekNorth Junior and Senior High School, a public school that houses grades 7-12, did not make AYP this year.

TrekNorth has 14 eligible groups and has met 85.7 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. This is the second time in the school's seven-year history it has not made AYP.

The school district did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency and the free and reduced price lunch student subgroup in math proficiency.

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School, a public school for grades 9-12, did not make AYP this year.

Voyageur's has three eligible groups and has met 33.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

This year, the school did not make AYP in all students' reading proficiency and all students' math proficiency. This is the sixth consecutive year the school has not made AYP.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP four years in a row are identified as in corrective action. These districts must:

E Develop a district improvement plan.

E Set aside and spend 10 percent of the district's Title I allocation on professional development.

E Move no funds between NCLB programs.

The district must set aside a fixed amount of funds to help with the district improvement plan. The Minnesota Department of Education contracts with statewide regional education service cooperatives to provide technical assistance for the development and implementation of district improvement plan.

Schoolcraft Learning Community

Schoolcraft Learning Community, a public school for grades K-9, did not make AYP this year. This is the second year the school has not make AYP since 2003.

Schoolcraft has 15 eligible groups and has met 93.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. The school did not make AYP this year in special education math proficiency.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP two consecutive years in a row are identified as school choice. The district must:

E Set aside up to 20 percent of the amount of Title I funds (or a lesser amount depending on parent demand) to pay for costs of transporting students to a non-identified school.

E Inform parents about available choices.

E Describe the selection process, giving priority to the lowest achieving children from low-income families.

E Notify parents of the results of school selections and transportation availability.

E Determine method and route of transportation.

E Transport students to the newly selected schools.

State level

According to the Minnesota Department of Education, of the 2,291 Minnesota schools earning an AYP status in 2010, 1,060 schools made AYP compared to 1,066 schools in 2009.

There were 1,048 schools that did not make AYP in 2010, which remained the same as in 2009.

Minnesota currently has 342 Title I schools in need of improvement, which will be providing additional options and services to students.

The number of non-proficient students statewide is decreasing.

Other districts:

Blackduck Public School District, Blackduck Secondary, Kelliher Secondary, Red Lake Middle Level Alternative Learning Center, Laporte Secondary, Mahnomen Secondary, Mahnomen Area Learning Center, Waubun Area Learning Programs and Fosston Secondary were among the list of schools in the state that did not make AYP in 2010.

awilliams@bemidjipioneer.com

It's that time of the year again - when schools analyze test scores, graduation rates and attendance records after being notified by the Minnesota Department of Education as to whether or not they made the "AYP list."

All this measuring and analyzing has to be done, however, as there are rules to be followed when dealing with society's future leaders and taxpayer dollars.

Annual Yearly Progress, or AYP, is what the federal government uses to measure schools under the No Child Left Behind Act. NCLB is a federal act that ensures accountability for schools designated as Title 1 and Title III. Basically, the act holds districts accountable for student achievement.

AYP takes the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment - Series II test scores of students and analyzes those test scores within the following groups: all students; American Indian/Alaskan Native students; Asian/Pacific Islander students; Hispanic students; black students not of Hispanic origin; white students not of Hispanic origin; limited English proficient students; special education students and students eligible for free or reduced price meals.

Whether a school makes AYP, is based on math scores, reading scores, graduation rates and attendance rates. All four criteria are used to determine a school district's AYP status. A school or district is identified as either "making AYP" or "not making AYP" based on the AYP components.

NCLB requires 95 percent participation of all students in testing. It also requires 100 percent proficiency and math and reading by 2014 for all students with improvement each year; 90 percent attendance and 80 percent graduation rate.

Bemidji Area School District

Like individual schools, school districts also receive an AYP status each year. Bemidji School District made AYP this year.

The district status is calculated like the school status, except that unlike schools, districts need to meet AYP targets for graduation and attendance, not just one or the other.

Bemidji School District has 31 eligible groups and has met 100 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

The following schools within the district, however, did not make AYP:

Bemidji Middle School did not make AYP in American Indian and special education math and reading proficiency. This is the fifth year in a row BMS has not made AYP.

Bemidji Area Youth Learning and Working did not make AYP in all students' math and reading proficiency. Last year Bemidji BYLaW made AYP.

First City School did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency. This is the second consecutive year First City School has not made AYP.

Northern Elementary School did not make AYP in American Indian math and reading proficiency. Last year Northern made AYP.

TrekNorth Junior- Senior High School

TrekNorth Junior and Senior High School, a public school that houses grades 7-12, did not make AYP this year.

TrekNorth has 14 eligible groups and has met 85.7 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. This is the second time in the school's seven-year history it has not made AYP.

The school district did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency and the free and reduced price lunch student subgroup in math proficiency.

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School, a public school for grades 9-12, did not make AYP this year.

Voyageur's has three eligible groups and has met 33.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

This year, the school did not make AYP in all students' reading proficiency and all students' math proficiency. This is the sixth consecutive year the school has not made AYP.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP four years in a row are identified as in corrective action. These districts must:

- Develop a district improvement plan.

- Set aside and spend 10 percent of the district's Title I allocation on professional development.

- Move no funds between NCLB programs.

The district must set aside a fixed amount of funds to help with the district improvement plan. The Minnesota Department of Education contracts with statewide regional education service cooperatives to provide technical assistance for the development and implementation of district improvement plan.

Schoolcraft Learning Community

Schoolcraft Learning Community, a public school for grades K-9, did not make AYP this year. This is the second year the school has not make AYP since 2003.

Schoolcraft has 15 eligible groups and has met 93.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. The school did not make AYP this year in special education math proficiency.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP two consecutive years in a row are identified as school choice. The district must:

- Set aside up to 20 percent of the amount of Title I funds (or a lesser amount depending on parent demand) to pay for costs of transporting students to a non-identified school.

- Inform parents about available choices.

- Describe the selection process, giving priority to the lowest achieving children from low-income families.

- Notify parents of the results of school selections and transportation availability.

- Determine method and route of transportation.

- Transport students to the newly selected schools.

State level

According to the Minnesota Department of Education, of the 2,291 Minnesota schools earning an AYP status in 2010, 1,060 schools made AYP compared to 1,066 schools in 2009.

There were 1,048 schools that did not make AYP in 2010, which remained the same as in 2009.

Minnesota currently has 342 Title I schools in need of improvement, which will be providing additional options and services to students.

The number of non-proficient students statewide is decreasing.

Other districts:

Blackduck Public School District, Blackduck Secondary, Kelliher Secondary, Red Lake Middle Level Alternative Learning Center, Laporte Secondary, Mahnomen Secondary, Mahnomen Area Learning Center, Waubun Area Learning Programs and Fosston Secondary were among the list of schools in the state that did not make AYP in 2010.

Y awilliams@bemidjipioneer.com

It's that time of the year again - when schools analyze test scores, graduation rates and attendance records after being notified by the Minnesota Department of Education as to whether or not they made the "AYP list."

All this measuring and analyzing has to be done, however, as there are rules to be followed when dealing with society's future leaders and taxpayer dollars.

Annual Yearly Progress, or AYP, is what the federal government uses to measure schools under the No Child Left Behind Act. NCLB is a federal act that ensures accountability for schools designated as Title 1 and Title III. Basically, the act holds districts accountable for student achievement.

AYP takes the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment - Series II test scores of students and analyzes those test scores within the following groups: all students; American Indian/Alaskan Native students; Asian/Pacific Islander students; Hispanic students; black students not of Hispanic origin; white students not of Hispanic origin; limited English proficient students; special education students and students eligible for free or reduced price meals.

Whether a school makes AYP, is based on math scores, reading scores, graduation rates and attendance rates. All four criteria are used to determine a school district's AYP status. A school or district is identified as either "making AYP" or "not making AYP" based on the AYP components.

NCLB requires 95 percent participation of all students in testing. It also requires 100 percent proficiency and math and reading by 2014 for all students with improvement each year; 90 percent attendance and 80 percent graduation rate.

Bemidji Area School District

Like individual schools, school districts also receive an AYP status each year. Bemidji School District made AYP this year.

The district status is calculated like the school status, except that unlike schools, districts need to meet AYP targets for graduation and attendance, not just one or the other.

Bemidji School District has 31 eligible groups and has met 100 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

The following schools within the district, however, did not make AYP:

Bemidji Middle School did not make AYP in American Indian and special education math and reading proficiency. This is the fifth year in a row BMS has not made AYP.

Bemidji Area Youth Learning and Working did not make AYP in all students' math and reading proficiency. Last year Bemidji BYLaW made AYP.

First City School did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency. This is the second consecutive year First City School has not made AYP.

Northern Elementary School did not make AYP in American Indian math and reading proficiency. Last year Northern made AYP.

TrekNorth Junior- Senior High School

TrekNorth Junior and Senior High School, a public school that houses grades 7-12, did not make AYP this year.

TrekNorth has 14 eligible groups and has met 85.7 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. This is the second time in the school's seven-year history it has not made AYP.

The school district did not make AYP in all students' math proficiency and the free and reduced price lunch student subgroup in math proficiency.

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School

Voyageur's Expeditionary High School, a public school for grades 9-12, did not make AYP this year.

Voyageur's has three eligible groups and has met 33.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB.

This year, the school did not make AYP in all students' reading proficiency and all students' math proficiency. This is the sixth consecutive year the school has not made AYP.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP four years in a row are identified as in corrective action. These districts must:

- Develop a district improvement plan.

- Set aside and spend 10 percent of the district's Title I allocation on professional development.

- Move no funds between NCLB programs.

The district must set aside a fixed amount of funds to help with the district improvement plan. The Minnesota Department of Education contracts with statewide regional education service cooperatives to provide technical assistance for the development and implementation of district improvement plan.

Schoolcraft Learning Community

Schoolcraft Learning Community, a public school for grades K-9, did not make AYP this year. This is the second year the school has not make AYP since 2003.

Schoolcraft has 15 eligible groups and has met 93.3 percent of the requirements for AYP under NCLB. The school did not make AYP this year in special education math proficiency.

Under NCLB, districts which do not make AYP two consecutive years in a row are identified as school choice. The district must:

- Set aside up to 20 percent of the amount of Title I funds (or a lesser amount depending on parent demand) to pay for costs of transporting students to a non-identified school.

- Inform parents about available choices.

- Describe the selection process, giving priority to the lowest achieving children from low-income families.

- Notify parents of the results of school selections and transportation availability.

- Determine method and route of transportation.

- Transport students to the newly selected schools.

State level

According to the Minnesota Department of Education, of the 2,291 Minnesota schools earning an AYP status in 2010, 1,060 schools made AYP compared to 1,066 schools in 2009.

There were 1,048 schools that did not make AYP in 2010, which remained the same as in 2009.

Minnesota currently has 342 Title I schools in need of improvement, which will be providing additional options and services to students.

The number of non-proficient students statewide is decreasing.

Other districts:

Blackduck Public School District, Kelliher Secondary, Red Lake Middle Level Alternative Learning Center, Laporte Secondary, Mahnomen Secondary, Mahnomen Area Learning Center, Waubun Area Learning Programs and Fosston Secondary were among the list of schools in the state that did not make AYP in 2010.

awilliams@bemidjipioneer.com

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement