Sections

Weather Forecast

Close
Advertisement
Roly Turner, district governor for Rotary District 5580, tells Bemidji Sunrise Rotarians on Tuesday morning of his and Rotary International President Ray Klinginsmith's goals for the Rotary year. Turner is from Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. Pioneer Photo/Brad Swenson

Rotary International builds communities here, abroad

Email Sign up for Breaking News Alerts
News Bemidji,Minnesota 56619 http://www.bemidjipioneer.com/sites/default/files/styles/square_300/public/fieldimages/1/0806/201008130811-rotary-turner.jpg?itok=ZARvnhLU
Bemidji Pioneer
(218) 333-9819 customer support
Rotary International builds communities here, abroad
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619

Building communities, whether here or overseas, is an ongoing goal of Rotary International, says Roly Turner, Rotary District 5580 district governor.

Advertisement
Advertisement

"In District 5580 it's the clubs that identify the need in their own community, and they develop projects to meet the needs there," Turner said Tuesday. "And they form partnerships in the developing world ... to meet the needs of those communities."

Turner of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, was in Bemidji to meet with both the Bemidji Rotary Club and the Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club. He also participated in the weekend's Dragon Boat races, on the Foundation Alumni Race Team.

Rotary International President Ray Klinginsmith's theme for the year is "Building Communities -- Bridging Continents." Turner said the local district is already doing that, and he listed several Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club projects that fit the bill.

"Over the years, the number of district clubs like Bemidji have developed broader partnerships and moved their projects into programs to ensure longevity in those countries," Turner said Tuesday morning to the Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club.

The Bemidji Rotary Club has long worked in Honduras, focusing on aiding a community there. The Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club recently contributed to a water well project in Honduras. Both clubs have sent people abroad as part of Group Study Exchange programs.

He also lauded the Bemidji Sunrise Rotary for its programs for youth, especially in sponsoring an Interact Club at Bemidji High School. Turner also lauded toe partnership with an upcoming project with the Barrington (Ill.) Breakfast Rotary Club, which is sending members to Bemidji in September to work with Leech Lake youth on Camp Rabideau.

Calling Kllinginsmith a country lawyer from Missouri, Turner said the RI president's code is to "take pride in your work, talk less and say more, do what has to be done and remember that some things just aren't for sale."

Klinginsmith has chosen to continue the path set by the previous two international presidents, Turner said, which is a focus on six areas:

E Peace and conflict resolution and prevention.

E Disease prevention and treatment.

E Water and sanitation.

E Maternal and child health care.

E Basic education and literacy.

E Economic and community development.

"At first it sounds like we're spreading ourselves way too thin, but all these areas are really quite intertwined," Turner said. "It's also what we've been doing the last number of years in Rotary. The last few presidents in RI have agreed to stay on one path and make some real accomplishments rather than going hither and yon as each president wants to."

The Rotary year started July 1. Rotary District 5580 consists of more than 60 clubs in northern Minnesota, northwest Wisconsin, western Ontario and all of North Dakota.

"District 5580 can be very proud of the inroads it's made in these same areas," he said. "Ray also challenges us to be bigger, better and bolder. So let's not be afraid to grow our clubs; let's not be afraid to tell the community what we're doing."

One of the most public projects of Rotary International is the eradication of polio from the Earth. "We're so close, we're at the final inch," Turner said of the four nations that yet suffer from polio, a crippling disease.

"If we stop now, we'll lose everything we gained in the last 25 years," he said. The Rotary Foundation funds PolioPlus, Rotary International's project, and Turner set a goal of $2,000 average per club, with a minimum of $1,000.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged $355 million, provided Rotary matches with $200 million. Turner said Rotary has raised $140 million of that in the latest push. Overall, Rotary has contributed $800 million.

North America has been polio-free for 65 years, and he encouraged fundraisers to re-educate the public about polio and the need to eradicate it.

"Rotary has been evolving over the years," Turner said, adding that Rotary International has added a fifth avenues of service, "New Generations," which speaks of all the programs clubs do for youth. The others are Club Service, Community Service, Vocational Service and International Service.

"We know as we nurture younger people, those are future Rotarians," Turner said. "I strongly believe that is the future of Rotary."

Another of his goals is to compile the history of all the clubs in the district, a project not updated since 1970.

"I challenge all clubs to record their history," he said, adding he hopes to create a website for the club histories.

Turner also made a pitch for Rotarians to attend the annual district conference, this year April 27-30 in Grand Forks, N.D.

Building communities, whether here or overseas, is an ongoing goal of Rotary International, says Roly Turner, Rotary District 5580 district governor.

"In District 5580 it's the clubs that identify the need in their own community, and they develop projects to meet the needs there," Turner said Tuesday. "And they form partnerships in the developing world ... to meet the needs of those communities."

Turner of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, was in Bemidji to meet with both the Bemidji Rotary Club and the Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club. He also participated in the weekend's Dragon Boat races, on the Foundation Alumni Race Team.

Rotary International President Ray Klinginsmith's theme for the year is "Building Communities -- Bridging Continents." Turner said the local district is already doing that, and he listed several Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club projects that fit the bill.

"Over the years, the number of district clubs like Bemidji have developed broader partnerships and moved their projects into programs to ensure longevity in those countries," Turner said Tuesday morning to the Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club.

The Bemidji Rotary Club has long worked in Honduras, focusing on aiding a community there. The Bemidji Sunrise Rotary Club recently contributed to a water well project in Honduras. Both clubs have sent people abroad as part of Group Study Exchange programs.

He also lauded the Bemidji Sunrise Rotary for its programs for youth, especially in sponsoring an Interact Club at Bemidji High School. Turner also lauded toe partnership with an upcoming project with the Barrington (Ill.) Breakfast Rotary Club, which is sending members to Bemidji in September to work with Leech Lake youth on Camp Rabideau.

Calling Kllinginsmith a country lawyer from Missouri, Turner said the RI president's code is to "take pride in your work, talk less and say more, do what has to be done and remember that some things just aren't for sale."

Klinginsmith has chosen to continue the path set by the previous two international presidents, Turner said, which is a focus on six areas:

- Peace and conflict resolution and prevention.

- Disease prevention and treatment.

- Water and sanitation.

- Maternal and child health care.

- Basic education and literacy.

- Economic and community development.

"At first it sounds like we're spreading ourselves way too thin, but all these areas are really quite intertwined," Turner said. "It's also what we've been doing the last number of years in Rotary. The last few presidents in RI have agreed to stay on one path and make some real accomplishments rather than going hither and yon as each president wants to."

The Rotary year started July 1. Rotary District 5580 consists of more than 60 clubs in northern Minnesota, northwest Wisconsin, western Ontario and all of North Dakota.

"District 5580 can be very proud of the inroads it's made in these same areas," he said. "Ray also challenges us to be bigger, better and bolder. So let's not be afraid to grow our clubs; let's not be afraid to tell the community what we're doing."

One of the most public projects of Rotary International is the eradication of polio from the Earth. "We're so close, we're at the final inch," Turner said of the four nations that yet suffer from polio, a crippling disease.

"If we stop now, we'll lose everything we gained in the last 25 years," he said. The Rotary Foundation funds PolioPlus, Rotary International's project, and Turner set a goal of $2,000 average per club, with a minimum of $1,000.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged $355 million, provided Rotary matches with $200 million. Turner said Rotary has raised $140 million of that in the latest push. Overall, Rotary has contributed $800 million.

North America has been polio-free for 65 years, and he encouraged fundraisers to re-educate the public about polio and the need to eradicate it.

"Rotary has been evolving over the years," Turner said, adding that Rotary International has added a fifth avenues of service, "New Generations," which speaks of all the programs clubs do for youth. The others are Club Service, Community Service, Vocational Service and International Service.

"We know as we nurture younger people, those are future Rotarians," Turner said. "I strongly believe that is the future of Rotary."

Another of his goals is to compile the history of all the clubs in the district, a project not updated since 1970.

"I challenge all clubs to record their history," he said, adding he hopes to create a website for the club histories.

Turner also made a pitch for Rotarians to attend the annual district conference, this year April 27-30 in Grand Forks, N.D.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
randomness