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Prime Time/Paul Bunyan Senior Activity Center celebrates 50 years

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News Bemidji,Minnesota 56619 http://www.bemidjipioneer.com/sites/all/themes/bemidjipioneer_theme/images/social_default_image.png
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Prime Time/Paul Bunyan Senior Activity Center celebrates 50 years
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619

A Senior Center seeks to create an atmosphere that acknowledges the value of human life individually and collectively and affirms the dignity and self-worth of the older adult.

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This statement was taken from Senior Center Standards: Guidelines for Practice, National Council on Aging Publication 1978. Although this was written more than 30 years ago, this philosophy is as right on today as it was then and matches our own Senior Center Mission Statement to a T.

Actually our own Ada Holand could have written those philosophical words herself as she went on record back in 1961 by saying, "I firmly believe in promoting the interests and welfare of the aged.".

Ada's dream was to have a permanent place for senior citizens to meet, work and play. Ada was quite a ring leader. She recruited some of her friends to help her and they began searching for a place for their much needed "Day Center" as they called it at that time.

After many disappointments and no success, these dedicated ladies - Ada Holand, Ada Stinson, Olive Glenn, Retta Roberts, Mrs. Ray Schultz and A.E. Wright -decided to take matters into their own hands. It was June 1961. They cleaned and scrubbed and made spic and span the warming house at the City Skating Rink located at Seventh Street and America Avenue Northwest, which is now the site of the Northland Apartments.

They planned to play shuffle board on the concrete portion of the rink, croquet on the grassy portion and cards and dominoes in the warming house.

On July 12, 1961, the Center opened. About 70 people showed up to enjoy the games and have coffee and cookies. When things froze up in the fall, they moved to the REA building. Little did these ladies know that it would be years before a permanent location would be obtained.

So, although the Senior Center got its start in 1961 - they even had officers, Ada Holand, Art Tannen, and Edith Reinke -according to records, it was not until April 18, 1962, that a senior citizens council was officially formed under the auspices of the Health, Education, and Welfare Committee of the Beltrami Area Development Association.

Minutes of a meeting held on May 23, 1962, record, "The newly appointed committee for exploring the possibility of establishing a Senior Citizen Day Center met in the conference room of the Federal Building the morning of May 23, at 9:15 a.m. Ada Holand served coffee and donuts, which had been donated by the Patterson and Andy's Bakeries with the Fenske Dairy donating the coffee cream."

Members of this committee represented various organizations such as Beltrami County welfare, Lutheran and Methodist churches, city manager's office, Rotary and Lions Clubs, and Junior Chamber of Commerce. Mrs. C.R. Sattgast chaired the meeting. Other members attending were Mrs. Lyle Christianson, Olive Glenn, Nick Welle, Allen Locke, Roger Headley, Rev. Megordon, Mrs. W.C. Woods, Ada Holand, and Don St Aubin. Mr. Guy Booth, a field representative on aging appointed by the Governor, attended the meeting and reported that "The percentage of older people in Bemidji is greater than the national average. According to a 1960 census, the number of seniors over the age of 65 in the city is now 1,200 with a proportionate number in the county. This number shows that this county has a potential need for a Day Center in Bemidji."

Minutes of this meeting ended like this: "After some discussion it was decided that there should be a committee to explore places where there might be a day center and also there should be someone looking for a possible manager of such a center if it should be established."

On Oct. 16, 1962, a constitution was planned with a committee appointed with Chairman Art Tannen and Chair of the Area Development Association Bill Sliney. On April 23, 1963, the constitution was adopted. The Day Center was officially in business and the dream was beginning to take shape.

Chapter Two of the Senior Center Saga is yet to come.

If anyone out there has any interesting information about the history of the Senior Center call Ann Daley at 751-8962.

Upcoming events

E Saturday, Feb. 12, All-you-can-eat pancakes with three sausages, juice and coffee will be served from 8-10:30 a.m. Adults $5, children 9 and younger $2.50. The Craft Shop will be open

E Sunday, Feb. 13, Valentine's Day Celebration will be held from 2-4 p.m. featuring an afternoon of music, treats and fun. Timberline, made up of two local performing artists, John Essig and Kari Munson, will join forces to play music for dancing or just listening pleasure. There is no charge to attend this party. A free will donation, however, would be appreciated.

E Monday, Feb. 21, Senior Center closed for President's Day.

E Tuesday, March 8, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Mardi Gras Party. Come and enjoy coffee, cupcakes, music and beads.

Ann Daley and Pat Kroeplin are Paul Bunyan Senior Activity Center volunteers.

A Senior Center seeks to create an atmosphere that acknowledges the value of human life individually and collectively and affirms the dignity and self-worth of the older adult.

This statement was taken from Senior Center Standards: Guidelines for Practice, National Council on Aging Publication 1978. Although this was written more than 30 years ago, this philosophy is as right on today as it was then and matches our own Senior Center Mission Statement to a T.

Actually our own Ada Holand could have written those philosophical words herself as she went on record back in 1961 by saying, "I firmly believe in promoting the interests and welfare of the aged.".

Ada's dream was to have a permanent place for senior citizens to meet, work and play. Ada was quite a ring leader. She recruited some of her friends to help her and they began searching for a place for their much needed "Day Center" as they called it at that time.

After many disappointments and no success, these dedicated ladies - Ada Holand, Ada Stinson, Olive Glenn, Retta Roberts, Mrs. Ray Schultz and A.E. Wright -decided to take matters into their own hands. It was June 1961. They cleaned and scrubbed and made spic and span the warming house at the City Skating Rink located at Seventh Street and America Avenue Northwest, which is now the site of the Northland Apartments.

They planned to play shuffle board on the concrete portion of the rink, croquet on the grassy portion and cards and dominoes in the warming house.

On July 12, 1961, the Center opened. About 70 people showed up to enjoy the games and have coffee and cookies. When things froze up in the fall, they moved to the REA building. Little did these ladies know that it would be years before a permanent location would be obtained.

So, although the Senior Center got its start in 1961 - they even had officers, Ada Holand, Art Tannen, and Edith Reinke -according to records, it was not until April 18, 1962, that a senior citizens council was officially formed under the auspices of the Health, Education, and Welfare Committee of the Beltrami Area Development Association.

Minutes of a meeting held on May 23, 1962, record, "The newly appointed committee for exploring the possibility of establishing a Senior Citizen Day Center met in the conference room of the Federal Building the morning of May 23, at 9:15 a.m. Ada Holand served coffee and donuts, which had been donated by the Patterson and Andy's Bakeries with the Fenske Dairy donating the coffee cream."

Members of this committee represented various organizations such as Beltrami County welfare, Lutheran and Methodist churches, city manager's office, Rotary and Lions Clubs, and Junior Chamber of Commerce. Mrs. C.R. Sattgast chaired the meeting. Other members attending were Mrs. Lyle Christianson, Olive Glenn, Nick Welle, Allen Locke, Roger Headley, Rev. Megordon, Mrs. W.C. Woods, Ada Holand, and Don St Aubin. Mr. Guy Booth, a field representative on aging appointed by the Governor, attended the meeting and reported that "The percentage of older people in Bemidji is greater than the national average. According to a 1960 census, the number of seniors over the age of 65 in the city is now 1,200 with a proportionate number in the county. This number shows that this county has a potential need for a Day Center in Bemidji."

Minutes of this meeting ended like this: "After some discussion it was decided that there should be a committee to explore places where there might be a day center and also there should be someone looking for a possible manager of such a center if it should be established."

On Oct. 16, 1962, a constitution was planned with a committee appointed with Chairman Art Tannen and Chair of the Area Development Association Bill Sliney. On April 23, 1963, the constitution was adopted. The Day Center was officially in business and the dream was beginning to take shape.

Chapter Two of the Senior Center Saga is yet to come.

If anyone out there has any interesting information about the history of the Senior Center call Ann Daley at 751-8962.

Upcoming events

- Saturday, Feb. 12, All-you-can-eat pancakes with three sausages, juice and coffee will be served from 8-10:30 a.m. Adults $5, children 9 and younger $2.50. The Craft Shop will be open

- Sunday, Feb. 13, Valentine's Day Celebration will be held from 2-4 p.m. featuring an afternoon of music, treats and fun. Timberline, made up of two local performing artists, John Essig and Kari Munson, will join forces to play music for dancing or just listening pleasure. There is no charge to attend this party. A free will donation, however, would be appreciated.

- Monday, Feb. 21, Senior Center closed for President's Day.

- Tuesday, March 8, 1:30-3:30 p.m., Mardi Gras Party. Come and enjoy coffee, cupcakes, music and beads.

--

Ann Daley and Pat Kroeplin are Paul Bunyan Senior Activity Center volunteers.

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Pioneer staff reports
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