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Pathways Through Our Past

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Bemidji, 56619
Bemidji Pioneer
(218) 333-9819 customer support
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619

Did you ever wonder?

Well the year 2011 is over and while we ate to much since Thanksgiving and with all the cooking and candy making for the holidays, I for one am going to make a few changes in my life.

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First off, getting rid of those clothes that I have been saving for when I rid myself of those extra pounds. I didn't think five pounds will make much of a difference in clothes fitting so I will go for 10 pounds and if that works then why not go another ten and etcetera. Well I am not sure if any of that works for me but I will at least try.

When I started to write, I put in lbs. for a measurement of weight I wanted to loose and reading back I was all ready allowing myself to use an abbreviation for pound. I could also have used #. It gets hard to remember to use the English words we were taught in school.

When did we get so lazy that we have to shorten our language, both the written and the spoken?

Here's a few that would have messed up a lot of people in early 1900s.

Lb. or # for pound, in. for inch, ft. for foot, car for automobile, min. for minute, hr. for hour, buck for a dollar and how about the months? Jan. Feb. Aug. Sept. Ju is that June or July and MA is that May. Ma (mother ).

How about this -- 2 Br apt 1/2 mi from HS has gar near Bji.

Now this means I think -- A two bedroom apartment one half mile from the high school has a garage, near Bemidji.

There are lots more but how about the spoken word?

The 7/11 store is open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. or 24/7 means 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Then there is 9-11 That stands for Sept. 11. That day deserves more recognition then just a few numbers.

Do you remember saving up? That's where you saved your change until you had enough to send for a special item you heard about in the news paper or in a comic book such as a decoder ring.

But kids were not the only ones who saved up. Adults saved to buy Christmas presents for their kids. A new ice box and sometimes a used car. No one had credit cards, certainly not children and in most houses such as ours if you bought something on time, it had to be completely paid for in full before it came through the door.

Moms saved up used material until they had enough to make a quilt and the rest of the scraps were used for new doll clothes and buttons and zippers were saved to be used again.

You could save up coupons for jewel tea dishes or thousands of terrible tasting savings stamps to fill pages that filled books that were redeemed for a special kitchen appliances, swing sets or a radio. It was like getting something for nothing.

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Pioneer staff reports
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