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Northome School News
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619


By Juleen Trisko

The Mustang Express

On Jan. 16, Mustang Winter Homecoming coronation took place at Northome School.


Lance Pink, son of Tom and Krissy Pink, was crowned king and Hollea Boquist, daugher of Terri Koithan and Terry Boquist, was crowned queen.

Elected prince was Cyril Weidenborner, son of Andy and LaVon Weidenborner and elected princess was Sadie Fraley, daughter of Dean Fraley and Tammy Fraley.

Filling the court were freshman Eli Rahier, sophomore Jonathon Halverson, sophomore Krissy Kallio, junior Danette Gieser, seniors Charlie Swang, Jeff Roosdett, John Lom., Ryan Riegel, Scott Pierson, Rachel Chaffin, Shelby Barreau, Becky Dreher, Kristen, White and Megan Halverson.

No school Feb. 20

There will be no school for students or staff Feb. 20 in observance of Presidents' Day.

Why do the Science Fair projects?

By Jim Schneider

Science Teacher

It is that time of year again.

Students in grades seven-9 are scrambling to come up with ideas for the annual science fair. Why does Mr. Schneider make us do that?

The answer to that question is not as simple as it may seem. On one hand it is a simple answer.

When I started teaching here I was told that I needed to keep the science fair going each year. There was no discussion on that topic.

Since then, the science fair has become a great tool to help students better understand science.

The science fair forces students to pose questions that they could ultimately answer with a science experiment or with some additional research. It also puts the scientific method into action.

Instead of just learning the steps that scientists use to solve science questions, now students get to work through the steps to answer their own questions.

More recently, the science fair has also had an added benefit.

With the new standards that the Minnesota Department of Education has issued to be followed, our students that complete the science project have met many of those standards in one project.

The science project that the students do usually meet all of or partially meets three or four standards.

This means that as a class, we can spend more time on other standards in class that may require more time to understand. It also allows for time that can then be used on the more "fun" areas of each class that go beyond the state standards.

Finally, the science project is also a good way to prepare for the state mandated science tests.

There are several questions each year that deal with the setting up and carrying out of experiments.

Our students have had experience in class in the laboratories with this. The science project provides a second learning tool to deal with these questions on the test.

So, it is now January and it is time to ask any student in grades 7 - 9 if they have their science project ideas yet. The answer should be "Yes." The time to experience science in a hands-on meaningful way is just around the corner.

Pioneer staff reports