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Nordic Showcase in Bemidji promotes Scandinavian heritage

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Nordic Showcase in Bemidji promotes Scandinavian heritage
Bemidji Minnesota P.O. Box 455 56619

Want to sample some rømmegrøt, or see traditional Norwegian dances?

The Sons of Norway Bemidji Lodge 500 on Saturday is sponsoring Nordic Showcase, a cultural fair of things Scandinavian to include samples of food, dance, crafts and displays.

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"I'm so pleased with the response I'm getting from all the members," says Jan Kittleson, Sons of Norway member who is spearheading the effort. "All are willing to donate their time, and only a few have said no."

Expected are some 300 or more community members to the Nordic Showcase, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at First Lutheran Church, 900 Bemidji Ave. N. Aside from the Christmas meatball and torsk dinner, the Showcase is the lodge's largest community event of the year.

"We've been planning something like this for four years," Kittleson said. "We want to showcase to the public what the Sons of Norway is all about and all we do to interest non-members and to pique the interest of members to become more involved."

Within the lodge, some members have special interests, such as collecting Norwegian medals that others may not be aware of.

"We also want to build camaraderie among members in planning something like this together," she said.

A highlight of the Showcase will be a dance exhibition by the NorSweDane Dancers from the Fargo Lodge of the Sons of Norway.

Specialty foods visitors will sample on Saturday include:

E Lefse by George and Karen Olson of Northome.

E Sandbakkels, a Norwegian sugar cookie, by Bonnie Follmer and Carol Krause.

E Flatbread by Carol Sorensen and Eva Stengel.

E Rømmegrøt, a Norwegian sour cream porridge, by Ardell Johnson, Clarice Amundson and Phyllis Wilcox.

E Vaffler, a thin Norwegian waffle, by Ellen Sovick and Sandy Bensen.

E Rosettes, a Norwegian dessert cookie, by Judy Lee and Yvonne Magaurn.

E Kransakke, a multiple-ring Norwegian cake that is unique and difficult to make. Joelyn Scriba is making two cakes.

E A main dish available to all will be the traditional Norwegian open-face sandwich, called smørdbrød, led by Judy Porter, Diane Easton, Bev Labratten and Ellen Jacklyn. Work by about a dozen members on the sandwiches begins today.

A number of artisans will also display their Scandinavian crafts, such as Sue Sutherland of Ely displaying how the traditional Norwegian dress, the bunad, is made.

Nancy Benson will show knitting skills, Yvonne Splady will demonstrate Handanger embroidery, and Marie Hamre will offer tatting. There will also be a weaving loom.

Woodcarving will be displayed by Bob Olson and the Swenson brothers.

Renowned rosemaler Mary Morton of Bemidji jwill display her work, as well as Angeline Hoffman. Allen Benson, formerly of Washington state, will display his late wife's renowned rosemaling as well.

Concordia Language Villages will have a booth, with lodge member Don Anderson available to talk about the scholarships the lodge offers to the Skøgfjørden Norwegian Village.

Rosemary Naastad and Linda Autrey will offer genealogy information.

Vicki Brown will talk about the lodge's sports program, such as its sponsorship of the Barnelopet ski race for kids.

A silent auction will be at the site, with some items including a Norwegian sweater and a Norwegian print, and items donated by Jane and Gunter Brackner who at one time owned a Scandinavian store on Third Street.

Also on display will be Don Norum's iron collection and information about Tubfrim, a charitable organization in Norway that collects stamps and uses the profits to underwrite care for handicapped children.

Some items will be offered for sale, Kittleson said, such as Norwegian books and Norwegian calendars.

Lynn Carlson from the Sons of Norway headquarters in Minneapolis will have a booth about financial products offered by the Sons of Norway.

The American Swedish Institute will provide a booth, and there will be some Danish displays as well.

Clearbrook author Harland Aakre will be present to sign books.

The event is free and open to the public, and will be held in First Lutheran Church's Fellowship Hall.

Y bswenson@bemidjipioneer.com

Want to sample some rømmegrøt, or see traditional Norwegian dances?

The Sons of Norway Bemidji Lodge 500 on Saturday is sponsoring Nordic Showcase, a cultural fair of things Scandinavian to include samples of food, dance, crafts and displays.

"I'm so pleased with the response I'm getting from all the members," says Jan Kittleson, Sons of Norway member who is spearheading the effort. "All are willing to donate their time, and only a few have said no."

Expected are some 300 or more community members to the Nordic Showcase, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at First Lutheran Church, 900 Bemidji Ave. N. Aside from the Christmas meatball and torsk dinner, the Showcase is the lodge's largest community event of the year.

"We've been planning something like this for four years," Kittleson said. "We want to showcase to the public what the Sons of Norway is all about and all we do to interest non-members and to pique the interest of members to become more involved."

Within the lodge, some members have special interests, such as collecting Norwegian medals that others may not be aware of.

"We also want to build camaraderie among members in planning something like this together," she said.

A highlight of the Showcase will be a dance exhibition by the NorSweDane Dancers from the Fargo Lodge of the Sons of Norway.

Specialty foods visitors will sample on Saturday include:

E Lefse by George and Karen Olson of Northome.

E Sandbakkels, a Norwegian sugar cookie, by Bonnie Follmer and Carol Krause.

E Flatbread by Carol Sorensen and Eva Stengel.

E Rømmegrøt, a Norwegian sour cream porridge, by Ardell Johnson, Clarice Amundson and Phyllis Wilcox.

E Vaffler, a thin Norwegian waffle, by Ellen Sovick and Sandy Bensen.

E Rosettes, a Norwegian dessert cookie, by Judy Lee and Yvonne Magaurn.

E Kransakke, a multiple-ring Norwegian cake that is unique and difficult to make. Joelyn Scriba is making two cakes.

E A main dish available to all will be the traditional Norwegian open-face sandwich, called smørdbrød, led by Judy Porter, Diane Easton, Bev Labratten and Ellen Jacklyn. Work by about a dozen members on the sandwiches begins today.

A number of artisans will also display their Scandinavian crafts, such as Sue Sutherland of Ely displaying how the traditional Norwegian dress, the bunad, is made.

Nancy Benson will show knitting skills, Yvonne Splady will demonstrate Handanger embroidery, and Marie Hamre will offer tatting. There will also be a weaving loom.

Woodcarving will be displayed by Bob Olson and the Swenson brothers.

Renowned rosemaler Mary Morton of Bemidji jwill display her work, as well as Angeline Hoffman. Allen Benson, formerly of Washington state, will display his late wife's renowned rosemaling as well.

Concordia Language Villages will have a booth, with lodge member Don Anderson available to talk about the scholarships the lodge offers to the Skøgfjørden Norwegian Village.

Rosemary Naastad and Linda Autrey will offer genealogy information.

Vicki Brown will talk about the lodge's sports program, such as its sponsorship of the Barnelopet ski race for kids.

A silent auction will be at the site, with some items including a Norwegian sweater and a Norwegian print, and items donated by Jane and Gunter Brackner who at one time owned a Scandinavian store on Third Street.

Also on display will be Don Norum's iron collection and information about Tubfrim, a charitable organization in Norway that collects stamps and uses the profits to underwrite care for handicapped children.

Some items will be offered for sale, Kittleson said, such as Norwegian books and Norwegian calendars.

Lynn Carlson from the Sons of Norway headquarters in Minneapolis will have a booth about financial products offered by the Sons of Norway.

The American Swedish Institute will provide a booth, and there will be some Danish displays as well.

Clearbrook author Harland Aakre will be present to sign books.

The event is free and open to the public, and will be held in First Lutheran Church's Fellowship Hall.

bswenson@bemidjipioneer.com

Want to sample some rømmegrøt, or see traditional Norwegian dances?

The Sons of Norway Bemidji Lodge 500 on Saturday is sponsoring Nordic Showcase, a cultural fair of things Scandinavian to include samples of food, dance, crafts and displays.

"I'm so pleased with the response I'm getting from all the members," says Jan Kittleson, Sons of Norway member who is spearheading the effort. "All are willing to donate their time, and only a few have said no."

Expected are some 300 or more community members to the Nordic Showcase, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at First Lutheran Church, 900 Bemidji Ave. N. Aside from the Christmas meatball and torsk dinner, the Showcase is the lodge's largest community event of the year.

"We've been planning something like this for four years," Kittleson said. "We want to showcase to the public what the Sons of Norway is all about and all we do to interest non-members and to pique the interest of members to become more involved."

Within the lodge, some members have special interests, such as collecting Norwegian medals that others may not be aware of.

"We also want to build camaraderie among members in planning something like this together," she said.

A highlight of the Showcase will be a dance exhibition by the NorSweDane Dancers from the Fargo Lodge of the Sons of Norway.

Specialty foods visitors will sample on Saturday include:

- Lefse by George and Karen Olson of Northome.

- Sandbakkels, a Norwegian sugar cookie, by Bonnie Follmer and Carol Krause.

- Flatbread by Carol Sorensen and Eva Stengel.

- Rømmegrøt, a Norwegian sour cream porridge, by Ardell Johnson, Clarice Amundson and Phyllis Wilcox.

- Vaffler, a thin Norwegian waffle, by Ellen Sovick and Sandy Bensen.

- Rosettes, a Norwegian dessert cookie, by Judy Lee and Yvonne Magaurn.

- Kransakke, a multiple-ring Norwegian cake that is unique and difficult to make. Joelyn Scriba is making two cakes.

- A main dish available to all will be the traditional Norwegian open-face sandwich, called smørdbrød, led by Judy Porter, Diane Easton, Bev Labratten and Ellen Jacklyn. Work by about a dozen members on the sandwiches begins today.

A number of artisans will also display their Scandinavian crafts, such as Sue Sutherland of Ely displaying how the traditional Norwegian dress, the bunad, is made.

Nancy Benson will show knitting skills, Yvonne Splady will demonstrate Handanger embroidery, and Marie Hamre will offer tatting. There will also be a weaving loom.

Woodcarving will be displayed by Bob Olson and the Swenson brothers.

Renowned rosemaler Mary Morton of Bemidji jwill display her work, as well as Angeline Hoffman. Allen Benson, formerly of Washington state, will display his late wife's renowned rosemaling as well.

Concordia Language Villages will have a booth, with lodge member Don Anderson available to talk about the scholarships the lodge offers to the Skøgfjørden Norwegian Village.

Rosemary Naastad and Linda Autrey will offer genealogy information.

Vicki Brown will talk about the lodge's sports program, such as its sponsorship of the Barnelopet ski race for kids.

A silent auction will be at the site, with some items including a Norwegian sweater and a Norwegian print, and items donated by Jane and Gunter Brackner who at one time owned a Scandinavian store on Third Street.

Also on display will be Don Norum's iron collection and information about Tubfrim, a charitable organization in Norway that collects stamps and uses the profits to underwrite care for handicapped children.

Some items will be offered for sale, Kittleson said, such as Norwegian books and Norwegian calendars.

Lynn Carlson from the Sons of Norway headquarters in Minneapolis will have a booth about financial products offered by the Sons of Norway.

The American Swedish Institute will provide a booth, and there will be some Danish displays as well.

Clearbrook author Harland Aakre will be present to sign books.

The event is free and open to the public, and will be held in First Lutheran Church's Fellowship Hall.

Y bswenson@bemidjipioneer.com

Want to sample some rømmegrøt, or see traditional Norwegian dances?

The Sons of Norway Bemidji Lodge 500 on Saturday is sponsoring Nordic Showcase, a cultural fair of things Scandinavian to include samples of food, dance, crafts and displays.

"I'm so pleased with the response I'm getting from all the members," says Jan Kittleson, Sons of Norway member who is spearheading the effort. "All are willing to donate their time, and only a few have said no."

Expected are some 300 or more community members to the Nordic Showcase, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at First Lutheran Church, 900 Bemidji Ave. N. Aside from the Christmas meatball and torsk dinner, the Showcase is the lodge's largest community event of the year.

"We've been planning something like this for four years," Kittleson said. "We want to showcase to the public what the Sons of Norway is all about and all we do to interest non-members and to pique the interest of members to become more involved."

Within the lodge, some members have special interests, such as collecting Norwegian medals that others may not be aware of.

"We also want to build camaraderie among members in planning something like this together," she said.

A highlight of the Showcase will be a dance exhibition by the NorSweDane Dancers from the Fargo Lodge of the Sons of Norway.

Specialty foods visitors will sample on Saturday include:

- Lefse by George and Karen Olson of Northome.

- Sandbakkels, a Norwegian sugar cookie, by Bonnie Follmer and Carol Krause.

- Flatbread by Carol Sorensen and Eva Stengel.

- Rømmegrøt, a Norwegian sour cream porridge, by Ardell Johnson, Clarice Amundson and Phyllis Wilcox.

- Vaffler, a thin Norwegian waffle, by Ellen Sovick and Sandy Bensen.

- Rosettes, a Norwegian dessert cookie, by Judy Lee and Yvonne Magaurn.

- Kransakke, a multiple-ring Norwegian cake that is unique and difficult to make. Joelyn Scriba is making two cakes.

- A main dish available to all will be the traditional Norwegian open-face sandwich, called smørdbrød, led by Judy Porter, Diane Easton, Bev Labratten and Ellen Jacklyn. Work by about a dozen members on the sandwiches begins today.

A number of artisans will also display their Scandinavian crafts, such as Sue Sutherland of Ely displaying how the traditional Norwegian dress, the bunad, is made.

Nancy Benson will show knitting skills, Yvonne Splady will demonstrate Handanger embroidery, and Marie Hamre will offer tatting. There will also be a weaving loom.

Woodcarving will be displayed by Bob Olson and the Swenson brothers.

Renowned rosemaler Mary Morton of Bemidji jwill display her work, as well as Angeline Hoffman. Allen Benson, formerly of Washington state, will display his late wife's renowned rosemaling as well.

Concordia Language Villages will have a booth, with lodge member Don Anderson available to talk about the scholarships the lodge offers to the Skøgfjørden Norwegian Village.

Rosemary Naastad and Linda Autrey will offer genealogy information.

Vicki Brown will talk about the lodge's sports program, such as its sponsorship of the Barnelopet ski race for kids.

A silent auction will be at the site, with some items including a Norwegian sweater and a Norwegian print, and items donated by Jane and Gunter Brackner who at one time owned a Scandinavian store on Third Street.

Also on display will be Don Norum's iron collection and information about Tubfrim, a charitable organization in Norway that collects stamps and uses the profits to underwrite care for handicapped children.

Some items will be offered for sale, Kittleson said, such as Norwegian books and Norwegian calendars.

Lynn Carlson from the Sons of Norway headquarters in Minneapolis will have a booth about financial products offered by the Sons of Norway.

The American Swedish Institute will provide a booth, and there will be some Danish displays as well.

Clearbrook author Harland Aakre will be present to sign books.

The event is free and open to the public, and will be held in First Lutheran Church's Fellowship Hall.

bswenson@bemidjipioneer.com

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