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The Minnesota Legislature’s end is near

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ST. PAUL — The Minnesota House takes up medical marijuana today in what could be a debate lasting well into the night, while pieces fall into place on tax and spending bills as the Minnesota Legislature nears the end of its 2014 session.

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Debate on the much-discussed proposal to allow children with seizures and adults with extreme pain to use marijuana extracts is expected to begin in the early afternoon, and could last hours. Senators overwhelmingly approved a more liberal bill earlier in the week, but it may go too far for Gov. Mark Dayton to sign it into law.

On Thursday, Dayton would not commit to backing a more restrictive marijuana bill by Rep. Carly Melin, D-Hibbing, that only allows one medical marijuana manufacturer, instead of 55 in the Senate-passed bill. Allowing 55 centers around the state “seems to be quite unworkable,” said Dayton, who has required medical and law enforcement support before signing off on any marijuana plan.

The Gov. Dayton said that Health Department staffers have been working the last several days to make sure any medical marijuana bill that passes is workable.

“Legislators’ hearts are in a good place,” he said. “They want to do something, but it has to be functional.”

If the House passes Melin’s bill today, House and Senate negotiators will take up the complex task of merging the two different bills into a compromise proposal. And it must be done in just a few days.

The state Constitution requires the Legislature to adjourn no later than May 19. While some legislative leaders had predicted a pre-Easter adjournment, the final day now looks to be no earlier than mid-week next week.

“The sooner we are done the better,” Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, said. “I would really like to get done this week. ... No one is safe until the Legislature adjourns.”

Formal and informal negotiations continue on several unresolved issues. Prime among them are how to spend a budget increase and what public works projects get state money.

Legislative leaders sent four key lawmakers into a room Thursday to negotiate a public works bill, to be funded by the state selling bonds. The hope is the four can work out the bonding bill so it is acceptable to the House and Senate, thus avoiding after-the-fact negotiations.

“It’s good to see cooperation and coordination, even beforehand,” Sen. Kent Eken, D-Twin Valley, said.

House Speaker Paul Thissen, D-Minneapolis, said leaders did not give orders to the four bonding negotiators about specifics that must be included in the bill. However, House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt, R-Crown, said there is an understanding that all four legislative leaders expect funding for the hot-button bonding issue: southwestern Minnesota’s Lewis and Clark water project.

The project, to bring water in from South Dakota, has produced by far the most bonding discussion.

Daudt said he hopes Lewis and Clark can get the $20 million needed to bring water to Luverne and a like about to fund the next phase. However, money may not be approved for the third phase, to extend the pipeline to Worthington, the minority leader said.

Rep. Rod Hamilton, R-Mountain Lake, said he is pushing for the entire $69 million Lewis and Clark funding.

While debate continues on how to spend money, a tax bill has been negotiated. It features an average $200 property tax break for farmers, as well as cuts for renters and homeowners.

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Don Davis
Don Davis has been the Forum Communications Minnesota Capitol Bureau chief since 2001, covering state government and politics for two dozen newspapers in the state. Don also blogs at Capital Chatter on Areavoices.
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